PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 15, 2021 


President Biden sets a date certain to end America's longest war, and more information could be the decider for some reluctant to get the COVID vaccine.


2021Talks - April 15, 2021 


With overwhelming bipartisan support, the Senate takes up anti-Asian American hate crimes legislation, and President Biden officially announces a full military withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Activists Call on New EPA to Regulate Ohio River Pollution

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Population growth often drives excess nutrient pollution, which triggers toxic algae blooms in the Ohio River and in waterways across the United States. (Adobe Stock)
Population growth often drives excess nutrient pollution, which triggers toxic algae blooms in the Ohio River and in waterways across the United States. (Adobe Stock)
 By Nadia Ramlagan, Public News Service - KY - Producer, Contact
February 2, 2021

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The Sierra Club is petitioning the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create nutrient standards for the Ohio River, on which five million residents rely for drinking water.

Hank Graddy, chapter water committee chair for the Sierra Club-Kentucky, said more than 700 miles of the river currently is unusable and is posing a threat to residents' drinking water.

He believes EPA action is needed to control nutrient pollution, because Kentucky and other states in the Ohio River Basin haven't taken regulatory action.

"Many people who look at the Ohio River would identify uncontrolled discharge of nitrogen and phosphorous from agricultural activities and from municipal sewer treatment plants and from utilities as the single greatest pollution problem in the Ohio and in many places across the nation," Graddy contended.

Large algae blooms covering hundreds of miles popped up in 2015 and 2019 due to excess nutrients, according to reports from the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission.

Graddy noted the EPA has already issued nutrient caps for Chesapeake Bay and Lake Erie.

He explained blue-green algae can produce a toxin that's harmful to the liver and can cause stomach pain, nausea, vomiting and other health effects in humans, and pointed out most treatment plants lack the ability to remove the toxin from the water supply.

"It's not adequately regulated, nobody's doing anything about it, and we keep loading more and more nitrogen and phosphorous into the system," Graddy asserted.

He added tourism revenue and other economic life that a healthy river brings to the Ohio Valley are at stake.

"The Louisville riverfront, the Owensboro riverfront, the Northern Kentucky riverfront," Graddy outlined. "These are assets to the community, and we need a river that is a part of that asset."

The EPA said more than 100,000 miles of rivers and streams nationwide are impacted by excess nutrient pollution, but experts say the number probably is much higher, because only a small percentage of streams are tested.

Disclosure: Sierra Club, Cumberland Chapter contributes to our fund for reporting on Climate Change/Air Quality, Public Lands/Wilderness, Sustainable Agriculture, and Water. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Best Practices