Saturday, October 23, 2021

Play

Some states entice people back to the workplace by increasing safety standards and higher minimum wage; Bannon held in Contempt of Congress; and the latest cyber security concerns.

Play

House votes to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress; Trump announces new social media platform TRUTH Social; and the Biden administration says it will continue to expel migrants under Title 42.

Play

An all-Black Oklahoma town joins big cities in seeking reparations; a Kentucky vaccination skeptic does a 180; telehealth proves invaluable during pandemic; and spooky destinations lure tourists at Halloween.

Indiana Students Tackle Climate Change Head On

Play

Friday, April 9, 2021   

By El'ad Nichols-Kaufman, The Daily Echo, as part of Earth Charter Indiana's Youth Environmental Press Team program in partnership with Indiana Environmental Reporter.

Broadcast version by Mary Schuermann Kuhlman Reporting for the Earth Charter Indiana/Indiana Environmental Reporter/Indiana News Service Collaboration


INDIANAPOLIS - There's frequently talk about climate change going on in the background, but despite being one of the most pressing issues of today, it rarely comes to the forefront of discourse. A group of dedicated Shortridge students is trying to change that.

The Diplomatic Corp, together with other student advocates and in partnership with Earth Charter Indiana, an environmental non-for-profit, has put together a climate emergency resolution calling for immediate action on climate change, which they are trying to get as many students and staff members as possible to sign. The resolution currently has over 40 signatures, with many more coming. This kind of resolution has only been brought forward at 11 schools before, and Shortridge would be the first in the state to make this much needed call for climate action. It has also been adopted by the Student Government unanimously.

Lizzie Perkins, a junior, has been leading the charge in this effort. Together with the Shortridge Diplomatic Corp and other student activists, she has developed the climate emergency resolution, built a climate activism focused lesson plan for her speech and debate class and helped organize a "chalk out" on March 17th, where students came by the school to write messages on the sidewalk in front of the school. "I want people to get excited," Perkins explained, "to see that it's possible for students to make a difference." She hopes to use this momentum to get students moving and hold policy makers accountable.

The enthusiasm was certainly shared by many of the students attending the "chalk out." Roman Moreno, a senior said that this really was a sign of the impact students could make. "The biggest change begins with small people. Fighting to be heard is our generational struggle." Jaret Camargo, also a senior, agreed, and pointed out what could be done in our own school with work from students. "There's so much we can do, even at Shortridge. I mean, Shortridge doesn't even recycle." Still, Bree Turner, senior, said that the school is moving forward. "We had it in speech class, the climate work, we need action."

Abby Schelbecker, a senior who was also at the chalk out, has a lot of experience in climate advocacy, having been involved since eighth grade, and having been an intern at Earth Charter Indiana last year. She got into advocacy because the situation is so bad now, that the responsibility for drastic action has fallen on our generation. "The fact that the next generations won't experience the earth as I do, I'd feel guilty to leave the planet to die." She has been involved in bringing green energy to Shortridge, trying to arrange solar panel installation. "We already have the roof assessed... The school would pay for the panels gradually with the money we'd save from electricity."

Jim Poyser, the executive director of Earth Charter Indiana, reflected on the impact that students are having on the wider community. "If you get young people involved, then the parents or grandparents have to come along as well." He noted that there's a lot of progress being made locally, but none of it really matters unless the General Assembly makes serious policy changes at the state level. Shannon Anderson, Earth Charter's assistant director, said that one of the best ways for high school students to make an impact is to contact their legislators. Even though most Shortirdge students have state senators and representatives who believe in climate change, you still have to "press your legislators to take a more active role. Ask them, what can I do to help?" Legislators are often happy to hear from young people, and are more than willing to help you get involved.

El'ad Nichols-Kaufman wrote this article for The Daily Echo, as part of Earth Charter Indiana's Youth Environmental Press Team program in partnership with Indiana Environmental Reporter. El'ad Nichols-Kaufman is a Shortridge High School junior and the editor of the The Daily Echo.


get more stories like this via email
California has collected more than 600 tons of unwanted prescription drugs since the Take-Back Day program began in 2010. (Dodgerton Skillhause/Morguefile)

Health and Wellness

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, when the Drug Enforcement Administration encourages everyone to clean out …


Health and Wellness

BALTIMORE - This month marks the four-year anniversary of the #MeToo movement, and an art project aims to help incarcerated survivors heal by telling …

Social Issues

OGDEN, Utah - Utah is one of only a handful of states that taxes food, but one state legislator says taxing groceries should become a thing of the …


In a new poll, 71% of all registered voters support strengthening rules to reduce oil and gas methane pollution, including 73% of Independents and 50% of Republicans. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

CASPER, Wyo. - A strong majority of voters across party lines say they want national rules similar to those passed in Wyoming to reduce methane …

Health and Wellness

ARLINGTON, Va. - Although COVID-19 rates have gone down, the virus continues to hit the Hispanic community especially hard. Now, a new campaign aims …

Child-care advocates say if North Dakota doesn't boost funding for the system, more families might pull out of the workforce because of access issues. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

BISMARCK, N.D. - A portion of American Rescue Plan funding sent to North Dakota has yet to be divvied up. Groups that want to improve the child-care …

Social Issues

PITTSBURGH - As businesses across the country deal with a massive labor shortage, Pennsylvania aims to entice people back to the workplace by …

Environment

ALBANY, N.Y. - Environmental groups want Gov. Kathy Hochul to sign a bill that mandates monitoring the state's drinking water for "emerging …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021