PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 16, 2021 


A new report says the infrastructure package in Congress would boost the nation's economy and create millions of jobs; Democrats prepared to move ahead with or without GOP.


2021Talks - June 16, 2021 


Biden and Putin set to meet face-to-face; Schumer moves toward reconciliation for infrastructure; a Juneteenth national holiday in the works; and Republicans call for Fauci's ouster.

MN Group: Chauvin Verdict Doesn't Mean Healing Is Over

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Activists await the Derek Chauvin verdict outside the Hennepin County Government Center. (Public News Service/Mike Moen)
Activists await the Derek Chauvin verdict outside the Hennepin County Government Center. (Public News Service/Mike Moen)
 By Mike Moen - Producer, Contact
April 21, 2021

MINNEAPOLIS - Ground-level community groups in Minneapolis say the Derek Chauvin verdict still is being processed on an emotional level, but they see it as an opportunity for all of Minnesota to take another step in addressing longstanding inequities.

Some racial-justice advocates said they have mixed feelings about Chauvin being convicted on all counts for the murder of George Floyd. In a sense, said Venessa Fuentes, director of network and narrative for the Headwaters Foundation for Justice, there's no justice because Floyd isn't alive. However, she said she still sees a window for the state, not just the Twin Cities, to speak up and take action.

"Whether you're on the front lines, on the streets moving justice forward, or whether you're on the back end of the movement and resourcing from a different place," she said, "whatever your skill sets are, whatever your talents are, we all have a role to play."

The foundation is located in south Minneapolis near where Floyd was killed. Fuentes said many of the community members she has close ties aren't at a point yet to fully embrace the outcome and declare victory.

Away from the trial, at the State Capitol, police accountability groups have been applying more pressure on lawmakers to adopt a host of reform measures.

As for community-level efforts, Fuentes said it's important to acknowledge that activists and residents will have to navigate a range of emotions in the coming months, in part because three other former officers in Floyd's case will see their trial begin later this year.

"There's still a lot of trauma in the community," she said. "There's still a lot to kind of work through."

She also noted the groups seeking justice for the death of Daunte Wright, who was fatally shot by a Brooklyn Center police officer this month. That former officer faces manslaughter charges. Although authorities have described the incident as an accident, there's controversy about whether those charges are sufficient.

Best Practices