Monday, August 15, 2022

Play

President Biden this week is poised to sign into law sweeping legislation that addresses climate change and prescription drug costs; Measuring the Supreme Court abortion decision's impact in the corporate world; Disaster recovery for Eastern Kentucky businesses.

Play

Federal officials warn about threats against law enforcement; Democrats push their climate, health, and tax bill through Congress; and a new report reveals 800 Americans were evacuated during the Afghanistan withdrawal.

Play

Infrastructure funding is on its way, ranchers anticipate money from the Inflation Reduction Act, and rural America is becoming more diverse, but you wouldn't know it by looking at the leadership.

MD Groups Press for Action on “Forever Chemicals”

Play

Wednesday, January 5, 2022   

With the Maryland General Assembly set to start next week, environmental groups are urging lawmakers to regulate toxic chemicals, after a new report shows elevated levels in state waterways.

Maryland's Department of the Environment found 75% of drinking-water samples tested contained harmful contaminants known as PFAS, or "forever chemicals."

Emily Scarr, state director of the Maryland Public Interest Research Group, which released the report, called the results "alarming," noting that this group of chemicals is used in thousands of products, from nonstick pans to firefighting foam.

"Where we found the highest levels of PFAS contamination in drinking water is around industry and around military bases, where PFAS is often used for training purposes," she said. "Some of the highest levels I've seen are in the Annapolis area, in Charles County, and some at the Aberdeen Proving Ground as well."

She said state Sen. Sarah Elfreth, D-Anne Arundel, and Del. Sarah Love, D-Montgomery, will introduce a bill in the General Assembly to ban PFAS chemicals in firefighting foam, food packaging and carpets, as other states have done in the past few years.

Studies have revealed links between these contaminants and serious health effects, including liver damage, cancer and harm to immune systems. Scarr explained that they also pose serious occupational health risks for folks such as firefighters, who are more likely to have increased exposure on the job.

"One of the things that makes this most dangerous is that it builds up in our bodies over time, similar to lead," she said. "So, this is particularly dangerous for our most vulnerable populations, like children who can be exposed for their lifetime."

In 2021, Maryland had to issue its first-ever fish consumption advisory. The state Department of Environment found elevated PFAS concentrations in largemouth bass, redbreast sunfish and yellow bullhead catfish in Prince George's County.


get more stories like this via email
In 2021, damages from floods and other severe weather in the United States exceeded $145 billion. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

In the wake of historic summer floods in the Midwest and Appalachia, there are calls for a new national plan to reduce risks from disasters. The …


Social Issues

Small businesses that suffered damage or destruction from the recent historic flooding in Eastern Kentucky can get one-on-one assistance as they try t…

Environment

The Inflation Reduction Act, newly passed by the U.S. Senate, allocates $369 Billion to fight climate change, and appropriates funds specifically for …


Social Issues

By Linda Burstyn for Ms. Magazine Broadcast version by Roz Brown for New Mexico News Connection/Public News Service Bad Business: Anti-abortion …

In Pennsylvania's Nov. 8 General Election, voters will decide races for governor, U.S. House and Senate, and several state offices. (Zimmytws/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

Opening up Pennsylvania's primary elections to voters who aren't registered either as Democrats or Republicans is the topic of a State House of Repres…

Social Issues

August is National Black Business Month, and this year, for Black-owned companies in Pennsylvania that have managed to survive through the pandemic…

Social Issues

On August 27, members of the public will have a rare opportunity to visit the historic Padlock Ranch first developed for livestock in 1867, now …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021