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Wednesday, July 24, 2024

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AL nonprofit urges Medicaid expansion to save rural hospitals; Harris skipping Netanyahu address shows daylight with Biden on Israeli leader; Biden to give first speech since dropping out of race; IN students face stricter attendance rules, new reading requirements; New Missouri law ensures medication access.

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Kamala Harris builds momentum toward nomination and vets potential Veeps. She and Trump take aggressive stances, as plans for a September debate continue. Sen. Bob Menendez says he'll resign, but will also appeal his corruption conviction.

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There's a gap between how rural and urban folks feel about the economy, Colorado's 'Rural is Rad' aims to connect outdoor businesses, more than a dozen of Maine's infrastructure sites face repeated flooding, and chocolate chip cookies rock August.

Experts say Healthy Listening Habits Can Prevent Hearing Loss

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Monday, July 25, 2022   

Hearing loss is on the rise, and as people return to loud places such as the gym after pandemic-induced hiatuses, medical professionals are advising them to protect their hearing.

Claire Johnson, manager of clinical services for UnitedHealthcare and an audiologist, said people have a tendency to turn up their headphones to drown out a noisy place like the gym. She suggested noise-cancelling earbuds or headphones can help.

"One good recommendation or quick, easy rule that we recommend is a 60/60 rule," Johnson explained. "Limiting music to 60 minutes at a time at 60% of the player's maximum volume."

Johnson pointed out anything above 85 decibels is considered the top end of the listening levels. Many headphones on the market can reach well above that, but there are phone apps to help people monitor the levels on their headphones. Johnson noted hearing loss is on the rise among young people, and it is connected to the devices used to listen to music.

Yin Ren, assistant professor of Otolaryngology at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center, emphasized hearing loss is not an injury which is going to go away. If you have persistent ringing or a loss of hearing, especially in one ear, he suggested seeking medical care right away.

"There's a time window sometimes in certain types of hearing loss that treatments are beneficial for," Ren stressed. "Your hearing is something that, often when it's lost, it cannot be recovered. So it's good to seek out either audiologists or an ENT or even your primary care to begin with."

According to the World Health Organization, half of people ages 12-35 are at risk of hearing loss due to prolonged and excessive exposure to loud sounds, including music they listen to through personal audio devices.

Disclosure: United Healthcare contributes to our fund for reporting on Health Issues. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


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