Friday, October 7, 2022

Play

Following a settlement with tribes, SD phases In voting-access reforms; older voters: formidable factor in Maine gubernatorial race; walking: a simple way to boost heart health.

Play

Biden makes a major move on marijuana laws; the U.S. and its allies begin exercises amid North Korean threats; and Generation Z says it's paying close attention to the 2022 midterms.

Play

Rural residents are more vulnerable to a winter wave of COVID-19, branding could be key for rural communities attracting newcomers, and the Lummi Nation's totem pole made it from Washington state to D.C.

New Bill Would Put Term Limits on SCOTUS Justices

Play

Thursday, August 18, 2022   

A bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would place limits on Supreme Court justices in the wake of several of the court's decisions.

The Supreme Court Tenure Establishment and Retirement Modernization or TERM Act would subject justices to 18-year term limits, after which they would be retired.

The bill comes at a time when confidence in the Supreme Court fell to 25% in June, according to a Gallup poll. This is down from 36% at the same time in 2021.

Georgia U.S. Rep. Hank Johnson - D-Lithonia - introduced the bill and said he feels this could keep the court relevant with the American state of mind.

"Our Supreme Court is not accountable to the people in its present configuration," said Johnson. "And so therefore, term limits will help to infuse modern thinking and keep the United States Supreme Court a modern branch of our democracy."

Should Congress approve the bill, five of the current justices would be retired from the court in throughout the next six years. Associate Justice Clarence Thomas would automatically be retired since he's been on the court for 31 years.

Another element of the bill calls for the most recently retired justice to temporarily serve on the court, should there be less than nine justices.

This is not the first time Johnson has introduced a bill to change the court's layout. In 2021, Johnson introduced the Judiciary Act of 2021, which would have expanded the Supreme Court from nine justices to 13.

Currently, the bill is being referred to a House subcommittee. Johnson said he feels even if this bill were to pass, there is an additional challenge in keeping the court up to date - lifetime tenure.

"We still get into this issue of lifetime tenure of justices who become stale in their thinking," said Johnson, "and more, and more unaccountable to the public, the older that they get."

Johnson said he feels if these bills pass, they will not only diversify the Supreme Court's thinking, but its physical look too.

Part of the hope behind the Judiciary Act of 2021 was to make the court more representative of the country through adding new justices of varying sex, age, ethnicity and legal background.

Currently, said he feels there are too many justices who got their starts in "silk-stocking" law firms.




get more stories like this via email

Nearly one third of people surveyed in June said they felt "very uncomfortable" with the level of their emergency savings. (wutzkoh/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

Between rising inflation and the ups and downs of the stock market, it isn't surprising that folks are concerned about their own financial situation…


Social Issues

The U.S. Postal Service is hiring 28,000 seasonal employees ahead of the surge in end-of-year holiday letters and packages for facilities in Michigan …

Social Issues

The roughly 2.4 million Ohioans who rely on Social Security income are expected to get a big boost in benefits, but advocates for the program are …


Environment

Ahead of revised methane regulations expected from the federal government, a new study shows that gas flaring in oil-producing states such as Texas …

According to a 2021 study by the American Heart Association, people who take at least 7,000 steps a day have a 50% to 70% lower risk of dying than those who take fewer daily steps. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

Even for Virginians who think they're too busy to exercise, experts say there's one surefire way to squeeze in a modest workout: walking. Although …

Social Issues

Groups challenging the criminal consequences for failing to pay rent in Arkansas say they'll take another run at it, perhaps as a class-action …

Social Issues

Wisconsin is one of 33 states allowing Social Security benefits to be extended to teachers. As the future of the program is debated, a retired …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021