skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Wednesday, December 6, 2023

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Making holiday travel manageable for those with a chronic health issue; University presidents testify on the rise of anti-semitism on college campuses; Tommy Tuberville's blockade on military promotions is mostly over.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Sen. Tommy Tuberville ends his hold on military promotions, the Senate's leadership is divided on a House Border Bill and college presidents testify about anti-semitism on campus.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Texas welcomes more visitors near Big Bend but locals worry the water won't last, those dependent on Colorado's Dolores River fear the same but have found common ground solutions, and a new film highlights historical healthcare challenges in rural Appalachia.

As Midterm Elections Approach, What Are the Risks?

play audio
Play

Monday, September 26, 2022   

Ahead of the November midterms, the Texas Secretary of State outlined details last week for a campaign aimed at educating voters before the November election, noting there will be more oversight.

Gov. Greg Abbott approved an elections bill last year banning 24-hour polling places, tightening ID requirements and limiting drive-through and voting by mail.

Wendy Weiser, vice president and director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, warned new tactics -- such as candidates claiming election fraud even if they win -- could lead to an election crisis.

"We think that great candidates can and should use all of the procedures available to them under the law and review election outcomes," Weiser acknowledged. "But we need to do a lot to reinforce the norm of accepting the results of a valid election."

According to the political website FiveThirtyEight, Texas has more 2020 election deniers running for the U.S. House or statewide office than any other state, with 201 of 552 Republican candidates convinced President Joe Biden did not win in 2020.

Jennifer Morrell, partner at The Elections Group, said she recently visited with election officials and found them exhausted.

"So, I think it's imperative that we acknowledge that these professionals, while continuing to hold the oaths they've taken and administer elections in a transparent and bipartisan way, are not working in a normal environment," Morrell cautioned. "They're not operating under ideal circumstances."

Morrell explained ultimately, elections are a human process, and worries even a minor glitch in November could lead to charges Texas elections are not fair.

"My fear is that an innocent mistake, or even something more normal like long lines or the delayed opening of a polling location, will somehow be used to further undermine the work of these election professionals," Morrell stressed.

Training to be a poll watcher in Texas requires a Certificate of Completion from the Texas Secretary of State's Office. In-person early voting in Texas starts Oct. 24 and continues until Nov. 4. Election Day is the following Tuesday, Nov. 8.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A recent survey by the Anti-Defamation League found nearly three in four Jewish students in the U.S. have experienced or witnessed antisemitism this school year. The Education Department's Office for Civil Rights has also opened investigations into alleged Islamophobic incidents at least a half-dozen colleges and universities. (Adobe Stock)

play sound

College presidents testified before a congressional committee Tuesday on the rise of antisemitism on college campuses since the Oct. 7 Hamas-led …


Social Issues

play sound

There are some bright spots in beefing up local news coverage, but a new report says in North Dakota and elsewhere, there are still big concerns …

Health and Wellness

play sound

Holiday stress is a concern for most people, but when you mix in travel plans and chronic health issues, those worries might be elevated. A …


The average cost in Ohio for college tuition and fees is around $10,049 per year, according to the Education Data Initiative. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

A new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau finds the repayment process for federal student loans has been filled with errors…

Social Issues

play sound

More than 3,500 foster children are available for adoption in Ohio, and state agencies are connecting with local faith congregations to help recruit …

An endangered Pacific leatherback sea turtle swims off San Francisco, in September 2022. (Geoff Shester/Oceana)

Environment

play sound

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife just announced a marine warden discovered an endangered Pacific leatherback sea turtle dead, drowned …

Health and Wellness

play sound

The state's largest county has just opened the new CARE Court system, designed to get help for severely mentally ill people in Los Angeles. CARE …

Environment

play sound

A Knoxville-based environmental group is voicing health and safety concerns about the development of a landfill for radioactive waste from the Y12 Ura…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021