skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Sunday, July 21, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Airline travel and more disrupted by global tech outage; Nevada gets OK to sell federal public lands for affordable housing;Science Moms work to foster meaningful talks on climate change; Scientists reconsider net-zero pledges to reach climate goals.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

As Trump accepts nomination for President, delegates emphasize themes of unity and optimism envisioning 'new golden age.' But RNC convention was marked by strong opposition to LGBTQ rights, which both opened and closed the event.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

It's grass-cutting season and with it, rural lawn mower races, Montana's drive-thru blood project is easing shortages, rural Americans spend more on food when transportation costs are tallied, and a lack of good childcare is thwarting rural business owners.

New Year Brings Wide Variety of New Illinois State Laws

play audio
Play

Tuesday, January 3, 2023   

It's a new year, and more than 180 new laws are going into effect, which Illinoisans need to know about.

The 2022 General Assembly passed bills ranging from changes to the criminal justice system to a new minimum wage. The most far-reaching new law is the Safe-T Act, an 800-page overhaul of the state's criminal justice system. However, one controversial clause in the act, the elimination of the cash bail system, is on pause after a state judge ruled it unconstitutional last week.

Garien Gatewood, director of the Illinois Justice Project, a group supporting the new law, said it could be tied up in the appeals process for several months.

"This thing was a massive overhaul of the criminal legal system," Gatewood acknowledged. "We have to continue to work and make sure that this thing is implemented properly, piece-by-piece, with stakeholders who are responsible for that and tracking how that's going."

Other notable new laws include increasing the minimum wage to $13 an hour, protecting individuals against discrimination based on their hairstyle, and eliminating fees for carjacking victims to pick up their vehicles from impoundment.

Another significant measure is the Workers' Rights Amendment, which guarantees public employees the right to organize and collectively bargain. Approved as a ballot initiative, the constitutional amendment also prohibits future laws limiting labor unions.

Ann Lousin, professor of law at the University of Illinois-Chicago, said it is part of a recent trend of unions returning to the workplace.

"It may be the coming thing," Lousin pointed out. "There are at least nine states that have a right-to-work amendment in their state constitutions, and many more that have it in their statutes."

And lawmakers, in their official capacity, designated a couple of new state symbols: the eastern milk snake as the official state snake, and dolostone as the official state rock.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
Vice President Kamala Harris spoke at a political event in Grand Rapids, Mich., in early 2024. (The White House/Wikimedia Commons)

Health and Wellness

play sound

Vice President Kamala Harris focused on reproductive rights at a campaign event in Michigan Wednesday. Her remarks come as President Joe Biden has …


Environment

play sound

Construction could begin in Minnesota later this year in the final phase of one of the nation's largest solar energy developments, after state …

Social Issues

play sound

Thousands of educators from across the nation will be in Houston starting this weekend for the American Federation of Teachers annual convention…


The Illinois State Board of Education report card said O'Fallon Township High School HSD #203 is currently only funded at 64%. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

By Kristy Alpert for Arts Midwest.Broadcast version by Terri Dee for Illinois News Connection reporting for the Arts Midwest-Public News Service Colla…

Health and Wellness

play sound

Counterfeit medicine sales are on the rise, in Connecticut and nationwide. The state faced trouble with growing sales of counterfeit Xanax pills …

Researchers said extreme events in nearly every region of Wisconsin are causing immense disruptions affecting human health, the economy and natural resources. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

So far, states like Wisconsin have largely escaped the worst of the summer heat affecting much of the nation but a group of scientists wants regional …

Social Issues

play sound

Postsecondary enrollment data for 2023 shows community college enrollment increased nationwide by more than 100,000 students, and a large percentage …

Environment

play sound

By Stephen Battersby for the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Broadcast version by Kathryn Carley for Commonwealth News Service…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021