skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Thursday, April 18, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

A new study shows health disparities cost Texas billions of dollars; Senate rejects impeachment articles against Mayorkas, ending trial against Cabinet secretary; Iowa cuts historical rural school groups.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Senate dismisses the Mayorkas impeachment. Maryland Lawmakers fail to increase voting access. Texas Democrats call for better Black maternal health. And polling confirms strong support for access to reproductive care, including abortion.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural Wyoming needs more vocational teachers to sustain its workforce pipeline, Ohio environmental advocates fear harm from a proposal to open 40-thousand forest acres to fracking and rural communities build bike trail systems to promote nature, boost the economy.

Texas Unions Want Offshore Wind to Provide Well-Paid, Safe Jobs

play audio
Play

Monday, March 27, 2023   

Offshore wind development is coming to Texas under the Biden administration's plan to grow America's clean-energy economy, and union members want the jobs to include proper safety and worker protections.

The federal government is seeking comments about which areas near Galveston to consider for the first-ever offshore wind lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico. The project is part of the administration's promise to establish 30 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030.

Luis Estrada, a plumbers apprentice and a member of Plumbers Union Local 68 in Houston, said stringent labor and equity standards need to be in place before hiring begins.

"We have every capability to make these jobs strong, family-sustaining jobs," Estrada pointed out. "But there's a lot of anti-worker laws here in Texas, and it makes Texas the most dangerous state in America to work."

Estrada was one of several union members who traveled to Washington, D.C., to deliver some 200 messages to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management about the unique challenges faced by Texas construction workers.

The U.S. Interior Department said projects proposed for Louisiana and Texas have the potential to power more than a million homes with clean energy.

PJ Shipman, an electrical apprentice and a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 716, said Texas' "right-to-work" laws should not limit living wage requirements and workers' compensation.

"To be able to set a standard for the clean-energy boom that we really believe is about to happen would be amazing," Shipman contended. "To set the standard in Texas where, to everyone's knowledge, is 'right to work.' "

Because they do not require valuable land space, offshore wind projects have risen in popularity.

Estrada added Texas union members want the emerging industry to succeed, but not at the expense of workers.

"The unions are going to be the only people who can keep up with the demand of these jobs," Estrada asserted. "But we just want the language to be in the leases; that these jobs are going to protect Texas communities and Texas workers."

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is accepting comments about the Texas wind proposals through April 25.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
Environmental advocates are asking California's next state budget to prioritize climate mitigation and cut tax breaks for fossil fuel companies. (The Climate Center)

Environment

play sound

As state budget negotiations continue, groups fighting climate change are asking California lawmakers to cut subsidies for oil and gas companies …


Health and Wellness

play sound

Health disparities in Texas are not only making some people sick, but affecting the state's economy. A new study shows Texas is losing $7 billion a …

Environment

play sound

City and county governments are feeling the pinch of rising operating costs but in Wisconsin, federal incentives are driving a range of local …


Each year since 2018, there have been more than 1 million online ads for guns which could be sold without a background check. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Well over three-fourths of Americans support universal background checks for gun purchases, but federal law allows unlicensed people to sell guns at …

Environment

play sound

By Max Graham for Grist.Broadcast version by Alex Gonzalez for Arizona News Connection reporting for the Solutions Journalism Network-Public News Serv…

During what is known as the Medicaid post-pandemic "unwinding" process, South Dakota saw the largest drop in children's enrollment in the country, with a 27% reduction in the first six months. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Last year's Medicaid expansion in South Dakota increased eligibility to another 51,000 adults but a new report showed among people across the state wh…

Health and Wellness

play sound

There is light at the end of the tunnel for Tennesseans struggling with opioid addiction, as a bill has been passed to increase access to treatment …

Environment

play sound

The New York HEAT Act might not make the final budget. The bill reduces the state's reliance on natural gas and cuts ratepayer costs by eliminating …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021