skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Wednesday, July 24, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

AL nonprofit urges Medicaid expansion to save rural hospitals; Harris skipping Netanyahu address shows daylight with Biden on Israeli leader; Biden to give first speech since dropping out of race; IN students face stricter attendance rules, new reading requirements; New Missouri law ensures medication access.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Kamala Harris builds momentum toward nomination and vets potential Veeps. She and Trump take aggressive stances, as plans for a September debate continue. Sen. Bob Menendez says he'll resign, but will also appeal his corruption conviction.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

There's a gap between how rural and urban folks feel about the economy, Colorado's 'Rural is Rad' aims to connect outdoor businesses, more than a dozen of Maine's infrastructure sites face repeated flooding, and chocolate chip cookies rock August.

Activists Put Spotlight on Treatment of Dogs at WI Research Facility

play audio
Play

Thursday, May 11, 2023   

A Wisconsin court case involving charges against animal rights activists remains in play.

Ahead of trial proceedings, various groups are calling attention to their claims of the mistreatment of dogs at a Dane County research facility. Three individuals face trial this fall over felony burglary and theft charges stemming from activity in 2017.

The animal rights group Direct Action Everywhere said the defendants rescued three beagles from Ridglan Farms near Madison. It asserted the trio was able to document filthy conditions and psychological trauma felt by the dogs, noting they were confined to small cages.

Wayne Hsiung, co-founder of the group, said the animals are bred for inhumane testing.

"After sometimes months or years of confinement that drives many of them to insanity, they're subjected to experiments that are so nightmarish that they're hard for people to believe are true," Hsiung contended. "I wouldn't believe they were true if I hadn't seen documentary evidence that these things were happening."

For example, the group claimed dogs are force-fed toxic compounds, including laundry detergents.

The facility did not reply to a request for comment. On its website, Ridglan Farms said it is committed to the highest standards of health while touting credentials from the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care. The Dane County district attorney declined to comment.

The Wisconsin-based organization Alliance for Animals is among those raising awareness about the issue.

Mary Telfer, the group's board president, said allies are not trying to diminish any need to advance scientific solutions, but argued such research is unnecessary.

"There are modern approaches that can test faster and more precisely than the outdated animal models," Telfer emphasized. "There are organs on chips and computer simulations and things that are so much better than this horrific suffering."

Jeffrey Brown, another Alliance for Animals board member, said while the public may not have direct interactions with species typically used for testing -- such as primates -- many people do have deep connections with dogs. He hopes it convinces them to pay closer attention.

"They're gonna think, 'There's no difference between the beagles that are in this lab and the dog that's right here. And I would never in my life would ever think about harming my own animal; why do I allow this to take place with just a different dog?'" Brown explained.

Disclosure: Alliance for Animals contributes to our fund for reporting on Animal Welfare, Endangered Species and Wildlife. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
Brian Burton with the Arkansas Food Bank said children experiencing malnourishment have a tougher time learning in the classroom. (fotokitas/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

By Mary Hennigan for The Arkansas Advocate.Broadcast version by Freda Ross for Arkansas News Service reporting for The Arkansas Advocate-Winthrop Rock…


Social Issues

play sound

Big changes are imminent in the way homes are bought and sold, as the new forms for transactions in California come out today. The forms are linked …

Social Issues

play sound

A university in eastern Oregon is figuring out ways to prevent rural 'brain drain.' Eastern Oregon University was officially designated "Oregon's Rur…


Gov. Mike Parson chose not to sign or veto Senate Bill 751, allowing it to become law automatically. (M. Suhail/Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

Gov. Mike Parson recently announced Senate Bill 751 would become law, allowing Missourians to access essential medications within their communities …

Social Issues

play sound

As students in Indiana head back to school, they will encounter some stricter classroom rules, including new reading requirements and a tighter …

Negotiating the costs of health care procedures using Medicare payments as a reference has proven effective in reducing health care spending, especially for large employers. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

The rates Medicare pays hospitals are carefully calculated to cover the actual cost of care in an efficient health care facility. But Anthem, Cigna…

Health and Wellness

play sound

An Alabama group is sounding the alarm about the need for Medicaid expansion, in part to keep rural hospitals in business. Many hospitals in Alabama …

Social Issues

play sound

Gov. Andy Beshear is among a small group being considered by Vice President Kamala Harris's team as a potential running mate. There are reports …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021