skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Saturday, March 2, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

As Congress and presidential candidates trade accusations over immigration reform, advocates and experts urge caution in spreading misinformation; Alabama takes new action IVF policy following controversial court decision; and central states urge caution with wildfires brewing.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Congress reaches a deal to avoid a partial government shutdown again. Arizona Republicans want to ensure Trump remains on their state ballot and Senate Democrats reintroduce the John Lewis Voting Rights Act.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Hard times could be ahead for rural school districts that spent federal pandemic money on teacher salaries, a former Oregon lumber community drafts a climate-action plan and West Virginians may soon buy raw milk from squeaky-clean cows.

Expert Wants Federal Investments to Help Ecological Health in AZ

play audio
Play

Thursday, August 10, 2023   

Experts across the West have met to discuss the potential impacts of the Inflation Reduction Act as the one-year anniversary of the piece of legislation approaches.

Michael Cravens, advocacy and conservation director for the Arizona Wildlife Federation, said the bill makes the largest investment in the nation's history to combat climate change, by incentivizing responsible clean-energy projects.

In Arizona, he pointed out climate change has made lack of water the biggest concern, despite good rainfall this past winter and now during monsoon season. He added when it comes to Arizona wildlife, there is very little discussion about the effects the shortage of water will have on ecological health and habitat.

"Repercussions to the region's wildlife remain overlooked as part of this crisis," Cravens contended. "Hopefully we start seeing some signs there and some more eyes on the problem."

He added many species are struggling to survive because of rising temperatures, changes in landscapes and humans pulling water from the Colorado River. Cravens noted as Colorado River levels continue to drop, it only equates to the shrinkage of not only habitat in Arizona but also the diversity of species that can be supported.

Cravens emphasized simply put, Arizona forests are not what they once were. He said because of the warmer and drier conditions, fires have become increasingly more intense and devastating. He is hopeful Inflation Reduction Act funding will be able to help address these concerns and allow forests to bounce back.

"Regarding future investments, I would love to see the restoration of these forests," Cravens stressed. "This is ongoing work, but closer to what we used to have through mechanical thinning and then putting fire back on that landscape in a controlled and safe way."

Cravens acknowledged he is not a climatologist but added those who are have said long-term drought can last for several decades based on what he calls "natural conditions." He said adding human-caused climate change into the mix throws "a big wrench into the system."


get more stories like this via email

more stories
House Bill passed with an overwhelming vote of 94-6, with three abstentions. Its companion, Senate Bill 159, passed unanimously with a vote of 34-0. (Chad Robertson/Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

The Alabama House and Senate both passed bills this week that would help people resume in vitro fertilization and provide legal protections for provid…


Social Issues

play sound

A new report finds some Missouri laws and prospective laws are perceived as discriminatory regardless of their actual intent - and it outlines some bi…

Environment

play sound

By Frank Jossi for Energy News Network.Broadcast version by Mike Moen for Minnesota News Connection reporting for the Joyce Foundation-Public News Ser…


Grants Pass, Oregon, is a rural community with a sustainability plan. However, local officials say the lack of dedicated staff to secure federal grants threatens the plan's success. (Claire Carlson/The Daily Yonder)

Environment

play sound

By Claire Carlson, John Upton and Kaitlyn Trudeau for The Daily Yonder.Broadcast version by Mark Richardson for Oregon News Service for the Public …

Social Issues

play sound

A new Network for Public Education report grades Florida an "F" for its public school funding. As Florida lawmakers negotiate the state budget in …

In a recent NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, 57% of Americans, including 84% of Democrats and 55% of independents, think America's openness to people from all over the world is essential to who we are as a nation. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

As members of Congress and presidential candidates battle it out over immigration, a group of Nevada leaders and experts dedicated to advancing …

Social Issues

play sound

A bill in Olympia would open access to unemployment while workers are on strike, but time is running out for lawmakers to pass the legislation…

Social Issues

play sound

With Pennsylvania's primary election less than 60 days away, a nonpartisan group is stepping up the pace to educate people on voting by mail and by …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021