skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Friday, June 14, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

SCOTUS begins issuing new opinions, with another expected related to the power of federal agencies, the battleground state of Wisconsin gets a ruling on alternative voting sites, and coastal work is being done to help salt marshes withstand hurricanes.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Supreme Court for now protects access to abortion drug mifepristone, while Senate Republicans block a bill protecting access to in-vitro fertilization. Wisconsin's Supreme Court bans mobile voting sites, and colleges deal with funding cuts as legislatures target diversity programs.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

As summer nears, America's newest and largest international dark sky sanctuary beckons, rural job growth is up, but full recovery remains elusive, rural Americans living in prison towns support a transition, while birth control is more readily available in rural areas.

ND property tax plan spurs debate about hurting local schools, governments

play audio
Play

Tuesday, October 31, 2023   

There are warnings of cuts to municipal governments and schools, and some loss of local control for budget decisions, amid efforts to eliminate property taxes in North Dakota. Organizers of a possible ballot question downplay those concerns.

Petitions are being circulated to get the issue on the 2024 ballot, asking voters to do away with property taxes by way of a constitutional amendment.

Nick Archuleta, president of the teacher's union North Dakota United, said the state would have to replace around one-and-a-half billion dollars in lost funding, some of which includes money for schools, and added not only does it make it harder to address teacher shortages, but the Legislature would have to play favorites.

"The smaller school districts across the state will be at a disadvantage in going to the Legislature for capital improvements like new schools," he explained.

He added future planning would be taken out of the hands of local officials. But leaders behind the petition say political subdivisions would still have flexibility to raise revenue through fee hikes. They add the state is overspending and that property owners need relief. Earlier this year, North Dakota adopted a $500 million package to help reduce the impact of income and property taxes.

Matt Gardner, executive director of the North Dakota League of Cities, which also opposes the ballot question effort, said there needs to be time for the recent tax package to bring the relief that was promised. In the meantime, he added if the petition ends up being successful, communities would be hindered in trying to thrive.

"If you don't have these resources available to you or other options, you're probably going to stagnate. I mean, some communities may find value in their community center and might be OK with property tax increases," he continued.

He said local governments might find it harder to maintain public safety services, such as buying new fire trucks. Meanwhile, petition organizers say any arguments about hurting responses to emergency situations, such as major snow events, don't add up. They contend property tax decisions are typically based on long-term strategies, not immediate operating expenses.

Disclosure: North Dakota United contributes to our fund for reporting on Children's Issues, Education, Livable Wages/Working Families. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
An Associated Press/NORC poll found 47% of people are unlikely to purchase an electric vehicle, with the biggest reason being the high cost. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

As New York and New Jersey transition to electric vehicles, consumers have mixed feelings about it. Polls show fewer than half of New York drivers …


Environment

play sound

Kentucky will receive $74 million to clean up legacy pollution in regions decimated by decades of coal mining. The money is part of $725 million in …

Social Issues

play sound

Legislation in Connecticut could help reduce the ongoing child care workforce shortage Reports show some 40,000 child care positions unfilled…


Of more than 7,300 lawmakers nationwide, just 116, or 1.6%, currently or last worked in manual labor, service industry, clerical or labor union jobs. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Half of Americans go to work every day in the service industry, doing clerical work or in construction and other manual labor jobs but fewer than 2% …

Health and Wellness

play sound

The Food and Drug Administration has advised makers of the COVID-19 vaccine to formulate the next dosage to fight the JN.1 strain of the virus…

New data show nearly 30% of Generation Z adults identify as LGBTQ+, according to the Human Rights Campaign. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Full-time LGBTQ+ workers make about 90 cents for every dollar earned by the average worker in the U.S. Today is LGBTQ+ Equal Pay Awareness Day…

Environment

play sound

About 1.6 million acres of Great Plains grasslands were destroyed in 2021 alone, according to a recent report, an area the size of Delaware. One …

Social Issues

play sound

Help is available for people looking to break out of a low-wage, "go-nowhere" job because the nonprofit Merit America is expanding its training …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021