skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Wednesday, May 22, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Black voters in battleground states are a crucial voting bloc in 2024; Nikki Haley says she's voting for Trump in November; healthcare advocates suggest medical collaboration to treat fibroids; distinct vibes at IU Indianapolis pro-Palestinian protest.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The House GOP moves to strike mention of Trump's criminal trial from the record, and his former rival Nikki Haley endorses him. Meanwhile, Ohio Republicans reject a legislative fix to ensure Biden's name appears on the November ballot.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Smokey Bear thought only "you" could prevent forest fires, but mushrooms may also help, a Native American community in Oregon is achieving healthcare sovereignty, and Colorado farmers hope fast-maturing, drought-tolerant seeds will better handle climate change.

Advocates remind Nevadans of solar, electrification incentives

play audio
Play

Monday, March 11, 2024   

Nevada is one of the largest solar markets in the nation and conservationists want Nevadans to be aware of available federal tax incentives.

Russell Kuhlman, executive director of the Nevada Wildlife Federation, is also a homeowner who installed solar panels. He realized going solar is not cheap, but added with newly expanded federal tax credits, you can get 30% back on your investment.

Nevadans can also take advantage of net metering, which allows customers to use energy generated by their solar system to offset their monthly bill.

Kuhlman pointed out the Inflation Reduction Act also includes rebates for more energy-efficient appliances.

"When I bought my house, everything was about 20 years old in terms of appliances," Kuhlman recounted. "Now that I have solar installed, taking even more advantage of those discounts in buying an energy efficient fridge, dryer, etc. So I am hoping to compound all of these discounts and tax incentives."

The Inflation Reduction Act included $8.8 billion to help increase home electrification and access to more efficient appliances. The Department of Energy estimated the rebates will save households around the country up to $1 billion annually on energy bills and support more than 50,000 jobs.

Kuhlman noted as more residential and commercial solar systems get installed, there will be less of a demand for what he calls "large-scale solar projects" on public lands.

"Reno and Vegas are some of the fastest growing cities that do have high potential for solar development," Kuhlman pointed out. "Trying to figure out a way to incentivize those large-scale developments, I think, is another thing we should be trying to incentivize."

Yazmyn Pelaez, communications director for the Nevada Conservation League, said solar investments can improve lives and homes as energy costs increase. She added it is an opportunity to move away from fossil fuels and ensure investments are reaching more communities.

"Not just homeowners, but renters," Pelaez stressed. "We are really working to make this transition as equitable as possible because we want to make sure that nobody gets left behind in this new clean energy transition."

Pelaez acknowledged many do not have access to solar because they rent or have roofs unable to have a solar system on it but believes community solar could be a viable option. Such facilities are shared by community members who receive credit on their electricity bills for their portion of the power produced.

Disclosure: The Nevada Conservation League contributes to our fund for reporting on Civic Engagement, Climate Change/Air Quality, Public Lands/Wilderness, and Water. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
Without net positive migration, the "zero migration" scenario demonstrates population decline could occur earlier in Michigan and be more severe. (Murad Mohd Zain)

Social Issues

play sound

Michigan's population has hovered around the 10 million mark for the past 20+ years, but the state's latest report outlines projections of a …


Health and Wellness

play sound

As outdoor activities ramp up, May is a good time to think about observing good skin-care practices. More skin cancers are diagnosed than all …

Environment

play sound

A new step from the federal government takes a step toward modernizing the process for building energy transmission lines - while also protecting wild…


The latest report from the Federal Trade Commission found some grocery price increases were unwarranted during the pandemic. (polack/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Americans got a bit of a reprieve last month, as food and auto prices dipped for the first time in 90 days. As Texas households continue to deal …

Health and Wellness

play sound

North Carolina's maternal death rate is higher than the national average and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among new moms in th…

According to various tracking organizations, 47% of FAFSA applicants are first-generation college students. (Adobe Stock)

play sound

The effect of technical glitches in overhauling the student financial-aid form known as FAFSA is still being felt. Issues stemming from a redesign …

Social Issues

play sound

A newly passed Connecticut bill will modernize the teacher certification process. House Bill 5436 is expected to make it easier for educators to …

Social Issues

play sound

Gov. Mark Gordon will address Wyomingites this week to detail new avenues for property tax relief. Following the pandemic, property values in …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021