Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 23, 2019 


A top US diplomat testifies that millions in military aid was held up over Trump demand for "Biden probe." Also on our rundown, a hearing today targets Big Oil and "climate denial."

2020Talks - October 23, 2019 


Facebook says it blocked four networks of social media accounts to prevent election interference; and Julin Castro announces he might not have enough cash on hand to keep the campaign going.

Daily Newscasts

National Hospice Month: Clueing Mainers in on Care Options

Maine's first lady Ann LePage is the keynote speaker Tuesday at an event to raise awareness for National Home Care and Hospice Month. Courtesy: Office of Gov. Paul LePage
Maine's first lady Ann LePage is the keynote speaker Tuesday at an event to raise awareness for National Home Care and Hospice Month. Courtesy: Office of Gov. Paul LePage
November 2, 2015

AUGUSTA, Maine – It's National Home Care and Hospice Month, and local advocates are using November to get the word out about end-of-life care and treatment options.

Kandyce Powell, executive director of Maine Hospice Council and Center for End-of-Life Care, says people are naturally fearful about thinking of death and dying, which makes it hard to get the word out that all sorts of advances have been made in this field – especially in palliative care, to ease the pain and symptoms for those with terminal illnesses.

"There's still a lot of people that are not aware of the choices they have for quality end-of-life care,” Powell states. “And because they are not aware, they can't make the most informed decisions about their treatment options."

Maine first lady Ann LePage will be the keynote speaker Tuesday for the National Home Care and Hospice Month Annual Tea at Blaine House.

Powell says some politicians aren't helping make this discussion any easier, particularly when they resort to describing end-of-life care conversations as death panels.

She says that kind of talk only stokes the natural fears that are common.

"With everybody – be it health care professionals, consumers – there's an insidious fear about discussing death and dying, and grief and loss,” Powell points out. “We don't ask questions, we don't know what to ask. We don't hear what somebody is trying to tell us."

Powell explains hospice and palliative care professionals have voluntary conversations with individuals facing life-limiting illnesses. She says they often discuss the person's fears and what gives his or her life meaning, as well as covering appropriate treatment options.


Mike Clifford, Public News Service - ME