skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Sunday, February 25, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

MN considers 'organizing' protections for renters; Nikki Haley says 'I have a duty' to stay in race despite latest loss to Trump; MT teachers' union files pair of 'school choice' lawsuits.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Donald Trump wins the South Carolina primary, but there's mixed feelings about what a second Trump term could mean, and President Biden addresses border issues with governors.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

Psychiatrist Offers Reasons for Hope Despite Rise in Youth Suicide

play audio
Play

Monday, October 16, 2017   

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - There is hope beyond the headlines, according to a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics, even as research shows children and teens are taking their lives by suicide in greater numbers.

Dr. Shayla Sullivant said stigma and easy access to guns are problems that can be remedied in individual homes. She pointed to famous figures who experienced depression and suicidal ideology, ranging from Abraham Lincoln to actress Halle Berry and author J.K. Rowling.

"Think of all these people and the contributions they have made to our society," she said. "There is reason for us to hope and there is reason for us to also think about how not having access to a firearm when these people were in the depths of despair is partly why they contributed what they did."

Sullivant said she often counsels parents of her clients to either remove guns from their homes or keep them locked in a safe. She said it's a misconception that youths always plan suicide well in advance of taking their lives. Often, she noted, teens who attempted suicide tell her they made their decision just 10 minutes prior to the act. If children don't have a highly lethal means to take their lives during this impulsive period, Sullivant said, their lives often can be saved.

It's simply not true, Sullivant said, that victims of suicide will always find a way to complete the act if the most lethal option isn't available. She pointed to the nation of Sri Lanka, which had the highest rate of suicide in the world when deadly pesticides were readily available. Once restrictions were put on the most lethal pesticides and safe storage was prioritized, the suicide rate plummeted. She also recalled that in the United States in the 1970s, many people didn't wear seat belts "and how no one wanted to do it - and how now we don't even blink, we just get in the car and do it."

Automobile fatalities were skyrocketing in the '70s, but the number of deaths per capita in auto crashes has dropped by more than 35 percent since that time. Sullivant said suicide rates among youths also can be dramatically curtailed by reducing stigma, keeping firearms stored or by family members making the decision to remove guns from the homes of struggling youths.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
The Florida Senate unanimously approved a comprehensive plan championed by Senate President Kathleen Passidomo and other advocates to broaden health care accessibility to accommodate the state's growing population. (TotalShape/Pixabay)

Health and Wellness

play sound

The Florida House is expected to follow the Senate's lead by signing off on an initiative to pour millions into the state's health care industry…


Social Issues

play sound

Pro-Ukraine rallies are planned in Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco as well as cities across the United States this weekend, marking the …

Social Issues

play sound

New York activists are voicing serious concerns about the state's new congressional maps. The state's top court ordered new voting-district maps to …


Some 200 miles of the Hudson River are considered a Superfund site due to the high amount of contamination, but only 40 miles of the Upper Hudson are General Electric's responsibility. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

New York lawmakers are calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to keep dredging the Hudson River. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., sent a …

Social Issues

play sound

A unique collaboration between Ford Motor Co. and 41 community and technical colleges across the country is helping students and the automotive …

New survey data from Maine's Consumers for Affordable Health Care found two of three Mainers said they would have difficulty paying a $500 medical expense.(Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

A new survey reveals most Mainers support policies requiring medical providers to disclose their facility fees before they receive treatment…

Social Issues

play sound

People who receive emergency food services from New Mexico food banks and other charitable organizations were among those at a strategic summit Friday…

Environment

play sound

North Dakota voters are divided on climate change matters, according to new polling data. To get more community buy-in for climate solutions…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021