PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 13, 2021 


President Biden taps Tracy Stone-Manning to be director of Bureau of Land Management; and Colorado schools get new tools to help students distinguish between news, commentary and disinformation.


2021Talks - May 13, 2021 


Republicans oust Liz Cheney from her leadership role, Dr. Anthony Fauci urges more vaccinations, NAACP leaders voice support for voting rights legislation, and Nancy Pelosi is optimistic about the infrastructure bill.

Community Colleges Pool Knowledge to Get People Back to Work

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Pasadena City College is contributing to an Opportunity America survey to help develop programs to get job-seekers the education they need. (Prayitno/Wikimedia Commons)
Pasadena City College is contributing to an Opportunity America survey to help develop programs to get job-seekers the education they need. (Prayitno/Wikimedia Commons)
 By Suzanne Potter - Producer, Contact
December 7, 2020

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- With more than 12 million Americans unemployed, community colleges and technical schools are collaborating to help people retrain for new jobs.

About 1,100 institutions nationwide are contributing to the Opportunity America survey on workforce development. California Community College System Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley said "upskilling" will be crucial to an equitable recovery from the pandemic.

"It isn't high-wage-earning, white-collar workers that have been impacted. It is blue-collar, front-line vulnerable workers at the lowest level that have been hit the hardest," Oakley said. "And these are individuals that community colleges have the greatest access to."

Ajita Menon is president of Calbright College, a state-run online community college. She said the survey results will promote best practices.

"It's a real tool for planning and innovation that we can share and understand and learn from what other institutions are doing," Menon said.

Colleges are being asked to complete the survey this month. Tamar Jacoby, president of the nonprofit Opportunity America, said she hopes the data will convince state lawmakers to allocate more for career education.

"The problem is, you have millions of Americans wanting these short, job-focused programs that the colleges are well positioned to provide, but in many states there's no way to pay," Jacoby said. "You can't use your Pell grant to pay for them. Most states do not fund them."

Salvatrice Cummo, executive director for economic and workforce development with Pasadena Community College, advises people looking for work to consider short-term community college courses that can lead directly to jobs in such hot industries as healthcare and computer science.

"Sit with the counselor and take a look at the programs that best fit your desires and interests and career path," Cummo said. "And have them share with you, what are the growth occupations?"

Cummo noted many of California's 116 community colleges now offer competency-based credentials that are designed to funnel graduates into fields that are in demand.


Support for this reporting was provided by Lumina Foundation.

Best Practices