Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 17, 2019 


Speaker Pelosi sends a message to Trump – No State of the Union in Congress while shutdown continues. Also on the Thursday rundown: federal employees in Michigan to rally against the shutdown. Plus a Green New Deal in New York raises the bar for clean energy.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Health Issues

Spending time outdoors is one way to combat the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and hypertension, all of which are higher for African Americans. (Pathways to Parks)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Western North Carolina's rich public lands are open to all, and a new group has decided to go the extra mile to encourage more people of color to enjoy them. Elsea Brown, director of Blue Ridge Forever campaign, says the Pathways to Parks group, based in Asheville, was for

Proposed changes to the definition of

RALEIGH, N.C. – Advocates for immigrants say changes to the definition of "public charge," a term used to issue green cards and permanent status, have given access to public services a bad rap. The changes would affect policies that govern how the use of public benefits may affect an individ

North Carolina's model for saving the lives of pregnant mothers includes giving them more options for prenatal and postpartum care. (Twenty20)

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Congress is asking U.S. healthcare systems why more women are dying from pregnancy-related complications, and North Carolina could have some solutions. Instances of pregnancy-related deaths in North Carolina have declined steadily since 2012, but overall, the U.S. is one

North Carolina's Neuse River at one of the Highway 581 crossings in Goldsboro, where the water level was already high before Hurricane Florence hit. (Robert Tucker/Flickr)

NEW BERN, N.C. — Communities in eastern North Carolina have a long road to recovery after Hurricane Florence. And scientific research indicates weather events like this weekend's intense rainfall are becoming more common, in part because of climate change - but there's a data gap in the resear

Methyl bromide reduces the spread of invasive pests when logs are exported, but it comes at a cost to the health of residents and the ozone layer. (Anna L Martin/Flickr)

DELCO, N.C. – A public outcry has resulted in a potential shift in state regulation of a chemical that many scientists say is a danger to public health and the ozone layer. Methyl bromide is used in logging operations in North Carolina to fumigate wood before it's exported. Few citizens in t

While it is unregulated by the EPA, there are concerns about human exposure to the chemical GenX and the fact it does not break down in the environment. (Vinoth Chandar/Flickr)

WILMINGTON, N.C. – This week, North Carolina lawmakers consider identical bills in House and Senate that would change the way the Department of Environmental Quality takes action on pollutants. Instead of its current model of enforcement, the governor would have to issue an administrative or

Fewer American parents are opting to circumcise their baby boys. The medical practice isn't as common in other Western countries. (Janelle/flickr)

GREENSBORO, N.C. — It's a medical procedure performed on more than half of American males, but there is a growing feeling among some that circumcision serves no valid medical purpose and may actually jeopardize male sexuality. This month the group Bloodstained Men & Their Friends is touring

The North Carolina prison system will no longer shackle pregnant women who go into labor behind bars. (Yada Liao/Flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. - When a woman in prison in North Carolina goes into labor, she will no longer have to be shackled. It's a policy shift that comes after advocacy groups voiced concerns about what they called an inhumane practice that endangers the safety of both mother and baby. While women's and civ

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