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Bike to Work Day: Health and Safety Promoted Friday

Photo: Friday is National Bike to Work Day, promoted as being good for your health and the environment. Photo credit: Alliance for Biking and Walking
Photo: Friday is National Bike to Work Day, promoted as being good for your health and the environment. Photo credit: Alliance for Biking and Walking
May 15, 2014

HARTFORD, Conn. – It's time to check your tire pressure and pull out your helmet to join those who will be cycling to work Friday for National Bike to Work Day in Connecticut.

State Sen. Beth Bye says she enjoys biking to work on a regular basis, and for those who live close to work, the event calls attention to the fact that cycling can be a great way to commute.

"Well, I think it is very important to raise awareness about how easy it is to bike to work,” Bye says. “Good for the environment, good for your health – so it's a win-win."

Last year more, than 600 people signed a pledge to bike to work, with the longest commute being a 65-mile trek one-way from Old Saybrook to Hartford.

Bye notes this year's event comes as Gov. Dannel Malloy is signing a new law that increases protections for people who share the roads with motor vehicles.

"It's a big deal in Connecticut,” Bye stresses. “We just need the people that build our roads to be more aware, too, to try to remember cyclists as they are planning intersections and revamping roads – that there are some simple things they can do to make it safer."

Bye adds companies, organizations and state agencies are urged to compete to see who can sign up the most people to pledge to cycle on National Bike to Work Day.

"The governor's invited to join us,” she says. “It's usually a fun ride and we'll have an event at the Old State house, and then people head off to work."

The Connecticut Department of Children and Families gathered more than 200 pledges for Bike to Work last year, and Pratt & Whitney placed first for local companies getting people to pedal to work.


Mike Clifford, Public News Service - CT