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Report: Commonwealth Offers College Grads Best Odds of Landing a Job

PHOTO: Massachusetts comes out tops in the nation in a new Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce report on states where college graduates have the best odds of landing a job. Photo credit: Mike Clifford.
PHOTO: Massachusetts comes out tops in the nation in a new Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce report on states where college graduates have the best odds of landing a job. Photo credit: Mike Clifford.
March 30, 2015

BOSTON – A new report finds you can't beat Massachusetts if you're a college graduate looking for a state with the best odds of landing a job.

The report from the Georgetown Center on Education and Workforce crunched data from millions of online job postings nationwide.

Report author Tony Carnevale, the center’s director, says local employers have a high need for college level skills to help them compete in the new growth economy and on the information superhighway.

"Massachusetts really is the Mecca for the new economy, because it mixes the technical and the new highway service functions in the most robust way of any other state," he points out.

Carnevale notes that 63 percent of the job postings in Massachusetts require a college degree – that's the most of any state in the report. Delaware and Washington state round out the top three states that offer the best odds of landing a job for college graduates.

Carnevale uses the analogy of an iPad to explain what's happening in the job market. He explains only a fraction of its value comes from manufacturing it – most of the value comes from related services, from design to marketing, to creating apps. He says states that offer the best job prospects for college grads work the same way.

"A mix of technical, managerial and professional jobs, which are very characteristic of growth economies now,” he explains. “That is, it's not just about making the computer – it's about all the services and the lawyers and the designers that go with it."

Carnevale adds the texture of what employers are looking for is changing. While a degree is still important, employers want it to relate to the job they are offering.

"They're much more focused on specialization and degree specialization,” he says. “They care what you majored in in college, as much as they care whether or not you went."

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - MA