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PNS Daily Newscast - September 28, 2020 


The New York Times reports President Trump's tax returns show chronic losses; and will climate change make it as a topic in the first presidential debate?


2020Talks - September 28, 2020 


The New York Times obtains President Trump's tax returns, showing chronic loss and debts coming due. And Judge Amy Coney Barrett is Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Study: Environmental Hazards Cost Calif. $254 Million Annually

PHOTO: A new report shows fixing environmental hazards could save California $254 million a year, and improve child health. Photo credit: Cheryl Holt/Morguefile.
PHOTO: A new report shows fixing environmental hazards could save California $254 million a year, and improve child health. Photo credit: Cheryl Holt/Morguefile.
June 16, 2015

OAKLAND, Calif. – A study released today by the nonprofit Public Health Institute (PHI) says California could save $250 million per year in healthcare costs – and improve the lives of millions of children – by eliminating exposure to preventable environmental hazards such as lead, pesticides, second-hand smoke, car exhaust and certain household chemicals.

Galatea King, health surveillance director with PHI and one of the authors of the California Environmental Health Tracking Program study, says she and her colleagues focused on multiple health conditions including asthma, leukemia, autism and ADHD.

"We looked at estimates of what amount of the burden of each condition could be attributable to the environment," she says. "We were looking at things that could be prevented."

According to the report, California could fund more programs to remove toxic lead paint, or build more clean, affordable housing to cut down on asthma. King says efforts to combat climate change are also key.

"The worsening environmental impact of climate change is going to affect children's health," she says. "Air pollution, dust and pollen in the air, water contamination and greater use of pesticides as our climate changes."

The researchers hope policymakers will use the data to justify more significant environmental efforts.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - CA