PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 25, 2020 


Democrats reported to be preparing a smaller pandemic relief package; vote-by-mail awaits a court decision in Montana.


2020Talks - September 25, 2020 


Senators respond to President Donald Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power. And, former military and national security officials endorse Joe Biden.

Government Integrity? Report Finds Michigan Lacking

State organizations say Michigan's open records laws need to be reformed. Credit: Brian Charles Watson/Wikimedia.
State organizations say Michigan's open records laws need to be reformed. Credit: Brian Charles Watson/Wikimedia.
November 10, 2015

LANSING, Mich. – Not only did Michigan receive a failing grade in a new 2015 State Integrity Investigation, it came in dead last in ethics and transparency laws.

The state failed in 10 out of 13 areas scored in the report released Monday by the Center for Public Integrity.

Melanie McElroy, executive director of Common Cause Michigan, says residents need to hold state government accountable by ensuring more information is openly available to the public.

"Because Michigan has become so weak on transparency and disclosure, the voices of ordinary people are being drowned out by special interests," she says. "There's really no safeguard for that. We have abysmal lobby disclosure laws."

According to McElroy, Michigan does not require elected leaders to disclose personal financial holdings, and the governor and state legislators are exempt from public Freedom of Information Act requests.

Michigan isn't alone at the bottom of the barrel – ten other states also received similar rankings. Alaska ranked the highest, with a "C" grade, in the study.

Opponents of expanding open records laws say it could jeopardize some constituents' private information. Lonnie Scott, executive director of Progress Michigan, says current law is failing the people of Michigan. He says the open records laws need to be reformed.

"Government is supposed to be for the people," he says. "Transparency is an important part of being able to hold government accountable. The lack of transparency and lack of information that comes out from our state government, at this point, is really sad."

In response to the findings, a state spokesperson says Governor Rick Snyder is focused on making Michigan a leader in transparency and ethics, referencing an "A-minus" grade the state received in a 2013 public transparency report from the Public Interest Research Group.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - MI