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New Attempt to Keep Ohio Clean Energy Standards on Ice

The debate over Ohio's freeze of clean energy standards is firing up again. (Pixabay)
The debate over Ohio's freeze of clean energy standards is firing up again. (Pixabay)
April 21, 2016

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio's freeze of its energy efficiency and renewable energy standards could stay on ice.

The initial two-year pause came in 2014, when opponents argued that the standards were too costly to implement, and now draft legislation calls for another three years.

The proposal is being circulated by state Sen. Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), who cites the confusion over conflicting mandates with a federal court case challenging the implementation of the Clean Power Plan.

But Dave Rinebolt, executive director of Ohio Partners for Affordable Energy, counters that it's been demonstrated that Ohio's clean energy standards would help the state comply with the federal standards to reduce carbon emissions.

"There seems to be ideological opposition to the Clean Power Plan,” he states. “And in fact, the proposed legislation changes the standards in such a way that it would reduce their ability to help us comply with the Clean Power Plan."

Ohio's clean energy standards require utilities to reduce customers' power use by 22 percent and get 25 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2025.

Environmental, business and faith leaders held a Statehouse rally Wednesday, calling for the freeze to be lifted.

The groups contend the standards are needed to reduce dangerous emissions that threaten public health.

Rinebolt adds that utility companies recognize the value in energy efficiency programs, and notes three of four electric utilities in Ohio continued their programs despite the freeze.

"If the freeze were extended, it doesn't support those utilities,” he points out. “It makes it harder for those utilities to take the least-cost options that would most benefit your average ratepayer."

Rinebolt adds that the clean energy standards would help boost programs that help homeowners save energy and lower utility bills.

"Energy efficiency and weatherization services are critical to low-income families, and we've been very successful at working with the utilities,” he stresses. “We want the state government to promote the policies that will let us help more Ohioans afford their energy bills."

A 2015 report from Policy Matters Ohio found that investments in low-income weatherization programs in Ohio dropped nearly a quarter after the standards were suspended.


Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH