Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 19, 2018 


Efforts continue to quell the backlash over President Donald Trump’s changing statements on the Russia summit. Also on the Thursday rundown: protestors are out for Mike Pence’s visit to Missouri; and nobody wants to go, but one option is green burials.

Daily Newscasts

Fast-Growing Bend Holds Meeting on Urban Growth Boundary

Bend is considering expansion of its urban growth boundary to accommodate the city's rapidly-growing population. (Another Believer/Wikimedia Commons)
Bend is considering expansion of its urban growth boundary to accommodate the city's rapidly-growing population. (Another Believer/Wikimedia Commons)
April 22, 2016

PORTLAND, Ore. - City managers in Bend held a meeting Thursday that will help shape the city's expanding borders after it is approved by a state commission.

Urban growth boundaries or UGB's hem in cities like Bend to prevent urban sprawl into rural areas.

However, Bend has consistently ranked as one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country over the last few years, and city planners such as senior planner Damian Syrnyk with Bend's Growth Management Department must take a lot of factors into consideration when drawing the new borderlines.

"We are growing rapidly, and whenever a city of Bend's size is essentially like a UGB expansion, it also involves some pretty significant updates to the comprehensive plan," says Syrnyk. "Our infrastructure plans for water, sewer and transportation; and just engaging a really broad and diverse group of citizens."

Oregon was the first state to require urban-growth boundaries with legislation in 1973. Local officials in cities such as Bend are asked to plan for expansion 20 years into the future.

Opponents of the decades-old legislation say as the state's population continues to grow, UGB's mean cities have less room to build new and affordable housing. But Syrnyk says Bend officials have learned a city needs more than land to build housing.

"We still have quite a bit of land in different parts of Bend that can be developed, but the landowners and other developers are really waiting for infrastructure to catch up," he says.

Although cities across the country have adopted urban growth boundaries, only Tennessee, Washington and Oregon require cities to adopt boundaries.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - OR