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The ground rules seem to have been set concerning the sexual assault allegations against nominee Brett Kavenaugh. Also on the Monday rundown: we will take you to a state where more than 60 thousand kids are chronically absent; plus the rural digital divide a two-fold problem for Kentucky.

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New Report: Transgender People Face Discrimination Well Beyond the Bathroom

Naomi Goldberg is co-author of a new report that finds transgender people are vulnerable to many forms of discrimination that make them far more likely to end up in jail and prison. (Jimenez/Funders for LGBTQ Issues)
Naomi Goldberg is co-author of a new report that finds transgender people are vulnerable to many forms of discrimination that make them far more likely to end up in jail and prison. (Jimenez/Funders for LGBTQ Issues)
May 26, 2016

BOSTON – A new report says it is not just controversial bathroom laws, but a wide range of factors that make transgender people vulnerable to a wide range of harm.

Naomi Goldberg, the report’s co-author and research and policy director for the Movement Advancement Project, says that includes being profiled and targeted by police as well as abuse in the criminal justice system.

She says data about the transgender community is scarce. So she and other researchers scoured the available information and came up with some striking numbers from several sources, including the National Transgender Discrimination Survey and the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics.

"We find that 1-in-5 trans women have spent time in prison or jail – so 21 percent – compared to just 5 percent of adults in the U.S. generally who have spent time in prison or jail,” she points out. “So, that's a pretty striking disparity. "

The report says in addition to bathroom laws, other laws disproportionately impacting transgender people include HIV criminalization and criminalization of sex work.

Goldberg says transgender people face unemployment and housing discrimination and too often are forced out of family and schools. She says the way to solve the problem is to protect this vulnerable population from discrimination.

"You know, at the most basic level – and certainly this is something that is happening in Massachusetts – is the conversation around how can we better protect transgender people from discrimination so that aren't put into vulnerable situations where they are pushed into the criminal justice system,” she points out. “So, stronger nondiscrimination protections, ensuring safe schools for all kids, eliminated the school-to-prison pipeline."

The report titled, "Unjust: How the Broken Criminal Justice System Fails Transgender People" was co-authored by the Center for American Progress. The report is part of a series focusing on gay, bisexual, and transgender people and the criminal justice system.




Mike Clifford, Public News Service - MA