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A Washington Mom's View of Historic Clinton Nomination

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Hillary Clinton says she's putting the "biggest crack in the glass ceiling yet" for women in the U.S. with her presidential bid. (Sarah Burris/Flickr)
Hillary Clinton says she's putting the "biggest crack in the glass ceiling yet" for women in the U.S. with her presidential bid. (Sarah Burris/Flickr)
 By Eric Tegethoff - Producer, Contact
July 29, 2016

SEATTLE - Last night, Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic Party's nomination, becoming the first female presidential nominee of a major party in U.S. history. Clinton said her nomination put the "biggest crack in the glass ceiling yet" for women, and Seattle mom Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner agrees.

As executive director of Moms Rising, a nonprofit grassroots group that supports family economic security, Rowe-Finkbeiner was in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention. She said moms still face discrimination in the U.S., but thinks Clinton's nomination could help turn the tide.

"Having one woman break the glass ceiling actually helps other women come behind, and helps lift us all," she said.

She added women in this country still face a wide wage gap. In Washington state, women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. The gap is even greater for moms and women of color. Nationally, working mothers make 73 cents, black women make 60 cents, and Latino women make 55 cents, for every dollar made by white men.

Rowe-Finkbeiner said she was at the convention to do more than watch Clinton's historic nomination. She was also promoting issues that affect working families across the country.

"Policies like paid family leave, sick days, fair pay," she added. "We're here talking with elected leaders about how the voices and the votes and the power of moms is important. And we do have a 'Moms Vote' program, which is to register moms to vote and turn moms out to vote in a nonpartisan way."

Democrats faced a divided delegate base coming into the DNC. Senator Bernie Sanders' delegates, including some from Washington, walked out of the convention on Tuesday following Clinton's nomination. During the roll call, Washington cast 74 of its 118 votes for Sanders.

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