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More Protests on Northern Pass Project

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017   

CONCORD, N.H. – With the New Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee planning its next hearing for the end of this week, opponents continue to speak out against the 192-mile Northern Pass power transmission project. The proposed line would carry power from Canada to New England.

Brian Tilton helped organize the Hands Around the State House Rally Against Northern Pass on Sunday. His biggest concern is how the project would impact the environment.

"That's number one, because you are talking about cutting through some of our purest landscape that we have in the state; and some of that is the most untouched landscape in the country," he said.

Tilton says another major question is who will pay for the project. He says Hydro Quebec is on record stating that they will not pay for the cost of the power line on the U.S. side of the border and that ratepayers would shoulder that cost. Supporters of the project say it will bring clean energy and benefits to ratepayers in the region.

Tilton says outdoor activities are vital to the Granite State's economy and he believes routing power through the state via tall transmission line towers will make the state a lot less attractive to outdoor enthusiasts.

"How it would affect our tourism industry, which is our biggest driver of jobs and our economy in this state; because people don't want to come here and look at towers up to 155 feet tall," he explained. "If they wanted to do that, they would just stay home."

The New Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee is scheduled to hold the next hearing on Friday, April 28 in Concord.


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