Monday, May 23, 2022

Play

Pennsylvania tries to land a regional hydrogen hub, a new study confirms college grads are twice as likely to get good jobs, and a U.S. military plane flies 35 tons of baby formula from Germany to Indianapolis.

Play

Operation Fly Formula's first shipment arrives, worries of global food shortages grow, President Biden is concerned about a monkeypox outbreak, and a poll says Americans support the Title 42 border policy.

Play

From off-Broadway to West Virginia: the stories of the deadly Upper Big Branch mine explosion, baby formula is on its way back to grocery shelves, and federal funds will combat consolidation in meatpacking.

State Senate Committee Presses Pause on 5G Wireless Bill

Play

Tuesday, May 16, 2017   

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Opponents of a bill intended to smooth the way for the rollout of next-generation cell technology are cautiously optimistic - after a key committee put the measure on hold on Monday.

The state Senate finance committee put Senate Bill 649 in the suspense file, in the face of vocal opposition from groups concerned that the 5G technology emits harmful millimeter-wave frequencies when compared with the 3G and 4G now commonly in use.

Josh Hart, director of the group StopSmartMeters.org, says the bill would limit local governments' ability to use zoning laws to block the proliferation of these towers near schools, hospitals and residential areas.

"This bill was basically written by the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association, the CTIA," he says. "This is their wish list. Local governments are the biggest impediment to them putting wireless wherever they want to."

Supporters of the bill say it will boost the economy by encouraging the spread of super-fast wireless connections in the Golden State.

The bill already sailed through the governance and finance committee but faced determined opposition from advocates on Monday, who organized hundreds of people to call into the hearing on a central conference line and express their concern.

A recent study by the National Toxicology Program found that male rats exposed to cell phone-like signals had a higher incidence of brain and heart tumors, compared with a control group.

Hart says other studies have linked 5G technology to skin and eye damage in humans.

"Approximately 5 to 6 percent of the population has been injured in some way by electromagnetic fields," he adds. "This is an acknowledged impairment in Sweden. Often these people's lives have been turned upside down. They've had to move into remote areas, lost jobs. This is a really serious and growing issue."

Hart says Santa Cruz and Marin counties and the League of California Cities have come out against the bill, which could be revived at any time before the end of the legislative session this summer.


get more stories like this via email

A 2017 study in The Lancet found 20% of people who are pregnant must travel more than 43 miles to get access to an abortion. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

Around 17% of bachelor's degrees awarded to Black students nationwide come from Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and research shows HBCUs boost economic mobility and generational wealth.(Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

One of North Carolina's oldest Historically Black Colleges and Universities is finding new ways to help students stay enrolled and graduate. Recent …


Social Issues

A new survey finds 8 in 10 Kentucky parents say afterschool programs could help their child combat social and mental-health struggles by reducing unpr…

Environment

A technology that once existed only in science fiction soon could emerge as a viable solution to climate change. The city of Flagstaff has added …


Environment

Minnesota has more than 10,000 brownfield sites, which are abandoned or idled properties in need of contamination removal. State officials will soon …

Georgetown researchers found that Black American women are the most likely to have to turn to student loans for college, and hold the most student loan debt, compared with their peers. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

By age 35, workers with a bachelor's degree or higher are about twice as likely as workers with just a high school diploma to have a good job - one …

Environment

The mayor of Huntington, where more than 200 homes were recently damaged by severe flooding, said now is the state's "one chance" to prevent other …

Social Issues

Alzheimer's disease is one of the leading causes of death in North Dakota, prompting state officials to launch an online dashboard, where the public …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021