skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Thursday, September 21, 2023

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Consumer health advocates urge governor to sign bill package; NY protests for Jewish democracy heighten as Netanyahu meets UN today; Multiple Utah cities set to use ranked-choice voting in next election.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Pentagon wants to help service members denied benefits under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," advocates back a new federal office of gun violence prevention, and a top GOP member assures the Ukrainian president more help is coming.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

An Indigenous project in South Dakota seeks to protect tribal data sovereignty, advocates in North Carolina are pushing back against attacks on public schools, and Arkansas wants the hungriest to have access to more fruits and veggies.

Lawmakers Push Constitutional Amendment to Overturn SCOTUS Ruling

play audio
Play

Monday, January 21, 2019   

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – It’s been nine years since the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its Citizens United ruling, which affirmed the rights of corporations to spend unlimited funds to influence elections.

Last week, Wyoming State Sen. Jeff Wasserburger (R-Gillette), a Republican, introduced a bill calling for a constitutional amendment to overturn the high court's decision.

As Kenneth Chestek, chairman of the advocacy group Wyoming Promise, explains an amendment is the only way to compel the Supreme Court to limit the influence of money in politics.

"Citizens United is at base an interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, of the First Amendment, and the only way to overturn the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Constitution is to change the Constitution," he points out.

So far, 19 states and some 800 cities and towns across the U.S. have passed non-binding resolutions calling for an amendment.

In 2010, the Supreme Court – citing precedents including Buckley v. Valeo in 1976
– ruled that political spending is a form of protected speech under the First Amendment, and the government cannot stop corporations from spending money to influence elections.

Chestek says equating money with speech moves American democracy from one person, one vote to one dollar, one vote.

Chestek maintains that's antithetical to the founders' egalitarian goal of ensuring that all citizens have an equal say in government.

"Money is not speech,” he stresses. “Money is a megaphone.

“If money can be used to drown out the speech of other people with less money, that creates an incredibly unequal allocation of political power, and that's simply wrong."

On the first day of the 116th Congress, a group of Democratic lawmakers introduced the Democracy for All Amendment to overturn Citizens United.

If passed, 38 states would then have to ratify in order for the measure to become the 28th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
Among 12- to 17-year-olds nationwide, 2.08 million or 8.33% report using drugs in the last month. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

In the wake of the devastating overdose epidemic in North Carolina, the state's Department of Health and Human Services is stepping up to aid …


Social Issues

play sound

In cities across the globe, including the Michigan city of Midland, various organizations are commemorating International Day of Peace today…

Social Issues

play sound

Georgia's young people could shift the political landscape of the state in the near future. New data from the Brookings Institution indicates that …


According to the EPA, tropical storms and hurricanes have become more intense during the past 20 years.(Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

In rural Alabama, where hurricanes and tornadoes are a constant threat, communities often struggle with damage and limited resources for extended …

Social Issues

play sound

A group of West Virginia Democratic delegates is calling for a special session to address West Virginia University's budget shortfall. Del. Evan …

Arborglyphs, or tree carvings, created by Hispanic sheep herders in the Medicine Bow National Forest date back to the early 1900s. (Amanda Castañeda)

Social Issues

play sound

While many Wyomingites of Hispanic descent came from Mexico, there is a lesser-known population from the old Spanish settlements of northern New …

play sound

People in rural America are five times as likely to live in so-called "ambulance deserts," areas far from an ambulance service or station, than those …

Health and Wellness

play sound

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is on the rise in Mississippi. About one in seven Mississippians lives with diabetes. Jernard A. Wells, cookbook …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright © 2021