skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

ND makes the grade in a national report evaluating public school support; SCOTUS justices express free speech concerns about GOP-backed social media laws; NH "kids on campus" program boosts retention; proposed law bans hemp sales to Hoosiers younger than 21.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Supreme Court hears arguments on whether social media can restrict content. Biden advisors point to anti-democracy speeches at CPAC, and the President heads to the US-Mexico border appealing to voters on immigration and border issues.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

Former Soldiers Battle Administration Over Climate Change

play audio
Play

Monday, March 11, 2019   

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. — Hurricane Florence left approximately $3.6 billion of damage at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. And a group of former military leaders and advisers say the partisan battle over climate change could harm our troops and national security in the future.

Retired Rear Admiral David Titley will testify before a Congressional panel on Wednesday. He is one of 58 who penned a letter pushing back against what they say is the administration's attempt to downplay the impact of climate change.

The review by the 12-member panel will be led by climate-change critic William Happer. The administration's official position is that climate change is a threat to national security. But Titley and his comrades say the appointment of Happer to the National Security Council and a leaked document say otherwise.

"The internal documents that were leaked show, in the administration's own words, that this so-called review is meant to be adversarial in nature and to undermine the well-established fundamental scientific underpinnings of climate science which have been established for well over a century,” Titley said.

Titley provided training and recommendations for a U.S. Army tactical unit based in Fort Bragg while others toured damage to Camp Lejeune caused by Florence last September. The former meteorologist said it's important to prepare soldiers for extreme weather events that are impacting bases and installations in a number of ways, including increased damage from flooding.

Extreme weather events and warmer temperatures have the potential to affect base training and testing by causing more "black flag" days when outdoor training is suspended, Titley said. He said a lack of training and preparation presents dangerous conditions for troops, and it's important for national security that U.S. military installations are prepared for severe weather.

"Do you have the right training? Do you have the right equipment, the right tools to be successful in a region where it may be seeing rainfall like they've never seen before, or you may be having many more high heat-stress days?” Titley questioned. “These types of disasters, be they hurricanes or floods or something like that, that becomes a tremendous distraction."

He said a lack of preparation for severe weather also has an impact on military families. Last year, up to 70 percent of the housing at Camp Lejeune was damaged by Florence and nearly 5,000 military personnel and their families reportedly were displaced.

Titley will testify before Congress as research is presented from a peer-reviewed National Climate Assessment from more than 80 independent scientific bodies.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
A new report shows that people who complete Prop 47-funded programs like those offered at Safe Harbor Recovery Center in Los Angeles are much less likely to be reincarcerated. (Safe Harbor)

Social Issues

play sound

Programs intended to reduce the chances that someone will end up back behind bars are working, according to a new analysis of California state data…


Social Issues

play sound

Arizona is gearing up for its presidential preference election that takes place in less than a month, and registered Democrats and Republicans were …

play sound

You might say "every day is 'bring your child to college day'" at New Hampshire's Manchester Community College. On-campus childcare programs are …


Social Issues

play sound

The number of Black mothers in Ohio who die during or following pregnancy continues to climb and health advocates said they hope to shine a light on t…

Legislative supporters say had South Dakota taken part in a new federally funded summer meal program for low-income families, an estimated 54,000 children around the state would have benefited. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

It's been an uphill battle for childhood nutrition advocates to advance meal access policies in the South Dakota Legislature. However, organizers say …

Environment

play sound

A cooperative effort has seeded more than 26,000 acres in eastern Nevada. It's all in an effort to increase desirable grasses, forbs and shrubs while …

Social Issues

play sound

Texas postal customers, especially in rural areas, are experiencing delays in mail delivery, and some letter carriers feel it could get worse…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021