skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, November 28, 2023

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Air pollution linked to coal plants more deadly than previously thought; Israel-Hamas truce extends as aid reaches Gaza; high school seniors face big college application challenges.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

House Republicans differ on January 6th footage, Speaker Johnson says any Ukraine funding must include changes to border policy and former New Jersey Governor Christie says former President Trump is fueling anti-Semitism and hate.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural low income youth, especially boys, experience greater economic mobility than those in cities, a new government rule should help level the playing field for small poultry growers, and the Kansas Governor wants her state to expand Medicaid.

Communities Still in Dark on Cape Fear River Contamination

play audio
Play

Wednesday, June 12, 2019   

WILMINGTON, N.C. - It's been two years since communities surrounding the Cape Fear River found out their water supply had been contaminated by a compound known as GenX, part of the group of hazardous chemicals called PFAS. Today, New Hanover County residents say they still need answers.

The source of the Cape Fear discharge was Chemours, a spinoff company of DuPont that manufactures industrial chemicals. GenX is a chemical byproduct of the manufacturing process, and also is found in Teflon and firefighting foam.

Emily Donovan, who co-founded the group Clean Cape Fear, said local residents remain in the dark.

"A lack of information does not equal 'safe,' and that's where we have been living for the last two years," she said. "We've been living with a lack of information, and we're being continually told the water is still safe to drink."

Donovan said research continues to show chemicals in the PFAS family - per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances - are toxic and carcinogenic. Last year, the North Carolina Legislature approved more than $5 million to fund the North Carolina PFAS Testing Network, a research group to test public drinking-water sources across the state for PFAS contamination.

Donovan said regulatory loopholes in the permitting process allow companies such as Chemours to discharge GenX and other proprietary compounds without having to disclose any information about them. She said GenX initially received a lot of media attention as a compound scientists were able to detect and identify. However, she said, little is known about other chemicals or byproducts that could have seeped into the Cape Fear River.

"In our area, we have an increase in testicular cancer; there's cause for concern for liver or kidney, and then, we also have thyroid cancer," she said. "What's tricky is to track down the other health risks because these are chemicals that have not been very well studied."

State Rep. Pricey Harrison, D-Greensboro, and other legislators have introduced House Bill 568, which would make it mandatory for companies to provide information about the chemicals they discharge and would suspend the permits of those that release unauthorized or undisclosed pollutants. The text of that bill is online at ncleg.gov.

Reporting by North Carolina News Connection in association with Media in the Public Interest and funded in part by the Park Foundation

Disclosure: Park Foundation - North Carolina contributes to our fund for reporting on Campaign Finance Reform/Money in Pol, Children's Issues, Consumer Issues, Environment. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
Last year Americans gave about $3.1 billion on Giving Tuesday, 15% more than in 2021. (DM/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Today is Giving Tuesday, a day when millions of Americans are expected to make charitable donations. But it can also be a field day for scammers…


Health and Wellness

play sound

Starting Friday, North Carolinians will have greater access to health care as the long-awaited Medicaid expansion is launched. Medicaid will …

Social Issues

play sound

A new project in Southern Arizona aims to support local reporting and enable greater access to local news and information. Earlier this month…


play sound

Researchers are out with new findings they say show that death rates linked to air pollution from coal plants are underestimated. A Wisconsin …

YouthTruth Student Survey finds 74% of the class of 2023 wants to go to college while 66% expect to go to college. The survey also finds the gap is further exacerbated when factoring in race and ethnicity. (Adobe stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Illinois high school seniors have new hurdles to overcome to get to college. High school students are waiting several extra weeks to get their hands …

Environment

play sound

Clean-energy companies and supporters are calling on federal officials to prioritize the development of charging infrastructure for EV powered medium …

Environment

play sound

Missouri's duck-hunting season runs through January, and many enthusiasts are concerned about how plentiful their future quarry will be because of a …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021