skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Electric bus movement looks to accelerate; Macron says he has not ruled out using Western troop to help Ukraine stand-up to Russia; two rural Iowa newspapers saved from extinction; BLM announces added protections for sensitive Oregon landscape.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Speaker Johnson commits to avoiding a government shutdown. Republican Senators call for a trial of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. And a Democratic Senator aims to ensure protection for IVF nationwide.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

Report: 91,000 Kids Remain in Poverty in Virginia

play audio
Play

Wednesday, September 25, 2019   

RICHMOND, Va. – Despite a long period of economic expansion since the Great Recession, the state of Virginia saw no progress in reducing child poverty since 2008, according to a new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The Kids Count data snapshot shows that 5% of children in the state, totaling 91,000 kids, still live in concentrated poverty.

African-American and Latinx children in the state are more likely to live in poverty because of systemic racism and policies that disproportionately affect their communities, says Margaret Nimmo Holland, executive director of Voices for Virginia's Children.

"It results in concentrated poverty in certain neighborhoods,” says Nimmo Holland. “And we're now seeing the result that even generations later, children in these neighborhoods are continuing to struggle because their families are struggling economically."

Nimmo Holland says policymakers need to focus on early childhood education and increasing the state's Earned Income Tax Credit to make a difference.

Children in high-poverty areas don't have access to quality health care or healthy foods – which they need to thrive, according to Scot Spencer, associate state director of advocacy at the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

He says living in poor neighborhoods often comes hand in hand with fear of violence, which can cause chronic stress linked to diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

"Living in high-poverty neighborhoods really puts young people at risk,” says Spencer. “And we think that they really deserve to live in communities where they can learn, play and grow."

Spencer says having quality schools, accessible job opportunities and safe places to play helps children become more successful adults.

Disclosure: Annie E Casey Foundation contributes to our fund for reporting on Children's Issues, Criminal Justice, Early Childhood Education, Education, Juvenile Justice, Welfare Reform. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A new report shows that people who complete Prop 47-funded programs like those offered at Safe Harbor Recovery Center in Los Angeles are much less likely to be reincarcerated. (Safe Harbor)

Social Issues

play sound

Programs intended to reduce the chances that someone will end up back behind bars are working, according to a new analysis of California state data…


Social Issues

play sound

Arizona is gearing up for its presidential preference election that takes place in less than a month, and registered Democrats and Republicans were …

play sound

You might say "every day is 'bring your child to college day'" at New Hampshire's Manchester Community College. On-campus childcare programs are …


Social Issues

play sound

The number of Black mothers in Ohio who die during or following pregnancy continues to climb and health advocates said they hope to shine a light on t…

Legislative supporters say had South Dakota taken part in a new federally funded summer meal program for low-income families, an estimated 54,000 children around the state would have benefited. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

It's been an uphill battle for childhood nutrition advocates to advance meal access policies in the South Dakota Legislature. However, organizers say …

Environment

play sound

A cooperative effort has seeded more than 26,000 acres in eastern Nevada. It's all in an effort to increase desirable grasses, forbs and shrubs while …

Social Issues

play sound

Texas postal customers, especially in rural areas, are experiencing delays in mail delivery, and some letter carriers feel it could get worse…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021