skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Monday, September 25, 2023

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Nevada organization calls for greater Latino engagement in politics; Gov. Gavin Newsom appears to change course on transgender rights; Nebraska Tribal College builds opportunity 'pipelines,' STEM workforce.'

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

House Republicans deadlock over funding days before the government shuts down, a New Deal-style jobs training program aims to ease the impacts of climate change, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas appeared at donor events for the right-wing Koch network.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

An Indigenous project in South Dakota seeks to protect tribal data sovereignty, advocates in North Carolina are pushing back against attacks on public schools, and Arkansas wants the hungriest to have access to more fruits and veggies.

Report: ID Nuclear Project Faces Major Hurdles

play audio
Play

Thursday, September 3, 2020   

BOISE, Idaho -- A new report says problems lie ahead for a new nuclear plant design in Idaho that will supply power to municipalities in six states.

Dr. M.V. Ramana, director of the Liu Institute for Global Issues at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs at the University of British Columbia, has studied nuclear power proposals around the world.

He said the small modular reactor project to be built at the Idaho National Laboratory has presented troubling signs for Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS) members.

For instance, the cost of the project has doubled, from $3 billion to $6 billion, in the past five years.

"UAMPS members could be on the hook for extreme cost overruns and project cancellation," Ramana warned. "Making it a risky proposition for them to continue investing in an untested, first-of-its-kind nuclear power facility."

UAMPS members include small cities and municipalities in Idaho, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the project last week.

John Hopkins, head of NuScale Power, the company behind the project, said it's a significant milestone for the advanced nuclear technologies to follow.

But Dr. Edwin Lyman, director of nuclear power safety with the Union of Concerned Scientists, believes there are flaws in the proposal.

According to Lyman, new nuclear plants should have significant safety improvements over current designs.

"The NRC should license and regulate new nuclear reactors in a manner that ensures that the risks they pose to public health and safety will be substantially lower than the risks of today's plants," Lyman said. "Unfortunately, by those standards, I think both the NuScale design and the NRC's approach to licensing it deserve failing grades."

NuScale has said it will produce power at $55 per megawatt hour. But Ramana is skeptical, and said renewable energy sources would be a better investment.

"Pursuing cheaper, currently available solar, wind energy storage batteries and energy efficiency would be a more reliable path for UAMPS to shift to a carbon-free energy future," Ramana added.

The Utah Taxpayers Association opposes the project.

It said cities and municipalities that want to avoid being locked into costs should hold public votes to withdraw from the agreement by Sept. 14. The first reactor is slated to go online in 2029.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
Peter Sussman is among three patients with disabilities who have asked to intervene in a lawsuit challenging California's End of Life Option Act. (Nancy Rubin)

Health and Wellness

play sound

California's medical aid-in-dying law is back in court. Three patients with disabilities and two doctors are asking to intervene in a lawsuit …


Social Issues

play sound

Little Priest Tribal College in Winnebago says its student body and campus are growing - and so are its options for people to study in STEM fields…

Health and Wellness

play sound

By Nathalia Teixeira for Kent State News Lab.Broadcast version by Nadia Ramlagan reporting for the Kent State-Ohio News Connection Collaboration…


The Biden administration recently announced that Medicare will soon begin to negotiate prices for up to 60 drugs covered under Medicare Parts 'D' and 'B,' through a new program under the Inflation Reduction Act. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Maine's new Office of Affordable Health Care holds its first public hearing this week, and people are being strongly encouraged to participate…

Social Issues

play sound

The number of children locked behind bars in Alabama has declined, but their advocates said more needs to be done to create alternatives to …

Environment

play sound

Scientists at Purdue University have been experimenting to create adhesives designed to be easier on the environment. So many products from …

Social Issues

play sound

It's Hispanic Heritage Month, and one Nevada organization wants Latinos to realize the power they can have when they are more politically engaged…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021