skip to main content

Sunday, May 28, 2023

play newscast audioPlay

Activists decry a Supreme Court ruling gutting the Clean Water Act, an Oath Keepers founder is sentenced to 18 years in prison, and the House votes to block the president's student debt relief program.

play newscast audioPlay

Democrats want vets protected in case of a debt default, the Supreme Court hampers the Clean Water Act, and Texas could follow other GOP states in withdrawing from a bipartisan effort to prevent voter fraud.

play newscast audioPlay

The growing number of "maternity care deserts" makes having a baby increasingly dangerous for rural Americans, a Colorado project is connecting neighbor to neighbor in an effort to help those suffering with mental health issues, and a school district in Maine is using teletherapy to tackle a similar challenge.

Pilot Project Aims to Build Climate Resilience at TX Health Clinics

play audio
Play

Monday, April 26, 2021   

HOUSTON, Texas -- Climate-change events can create a significant challenge for community health centers serving clients in states such as Texas. Three of those centers are now participating in a pilot project to enhance their response.

The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has identified clinics in Houston, Beaumont and Matagorda County that need support to address climate-related impacts on health and health care.

Dr. Aaron Bernstein, interim director of the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the school, said often people think of fortifying buildings to address climate change, but when hurricanes, heat waves or other disasters strike, care providers and clinics need to have resources that reduce harm to their patients.

"Patients with cancer, lung cancer in particular, in the state of Texas have worse outcomes when they're in counties that have been more heavily impacted by hurricanes," Bernstein explained.

When Hurricane Harvey hit in 2017, the Episcopal Health facility in Matagorda, a rural, underserved area, had to be evacuated. More recently, many patients and staff were impacted by February's unexpected winter storm.

Bernstein noted the pilot program will allow participating clinics to fill knowledge gaps about how to intervene for their specific patient populations.

Neena Arora, chief operations officer for the San José Clinic south of San Antonio, said with more extreme weather events that compromise access to power, medications and medical records clinics need to buffer risks to the patients that will improve health outcomes.

"Our patients live in these pockets of town which are lower in income, and they don't have the means to take care of what's needed when these storms hit," Arora stressed.

The project also will benefit clinics in California, Massachusetts and North Carolina.


get more stories like this via email
A new ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court means ephemeral streams, such as this one in the mountains east of San Diego, are no longer protected by the Waters of the United States rule. (Chris Hunkeler/Flickr)

Environment

play sound

The U.S. Supreme Court has gutted federal protections for much of the country's wetlands. The court found that the Waters of the United States rule…


Environment

play sound

Environmental advocates say the U.S. Supreme Court has dealt a major blow to the Clean Water Act and to Maine's ability to protect some of its most …

Environment

play sound

A U.S. Supreme Court case that began in Idaho has weakened protections across the nation under the Clean Water Act. The justices on Thursday handed …


As workers try to move forward from the pandemic's aftereffects, labor leaders, including the Minnesota Association of Professional Employees, say protections and stronger benefits should help get their careers back on track. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Minnesota legislators adopted a lot of major policies in this year's session, including actions to support workers in many different fields. State …

Environment

play sound

The nonprofit Trust for Public Land has published its annual ParkScore rankings, and some area cities are high on the list. Washington, D.C.…

The "Water Year" typically starts on Oct. 1, and represents the time when new water Iowa receives goes to help the next year's growing season. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

For the first time in nearly three years, the widespread drought that has had Iowa in its grip is predicted to end. The latest drought outlook says …

Health and Wellness

play sound

As the opioid epidemic continues to take its toll, a Virginia group is working to keep people safe. The Virginia Harm Reduction Coalition in Roanoke …

Social Issues

play sound

A new report outlined the importance of student debt relief to workers in New York and across the country. An American Federation of Teachers …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021