skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Republicans have put Merrick Garland in contempt of Congress; state legislatures are missing people from working-class jobs, and FDA has advice for formulating the next COVID vaccine for a new strain.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

House Republicans vote to hold AG Merrick Garland in contempt of Congress. The Senate battles it out over federal protections for in vitro fertilization. North Dakota becomes the first state to impose an age cutoff to run for Congress.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural America's job growth is up, but still hasn't recovered from the pandemic, about one in five rural Americans lives in a town with a prison, rural women seeking birth control have a new option, and dark skies beckon as summer arrives.

Women Face Money Crunch on Road to Political Office

play audio
Play

Friday, July 9, 2021   

SANTA FE, N.M. -- Women have voted at higher rates than men in every presidential election since 1984, but a new study shows when they run for a statewide executive office, money is harder to come by.

Kira Sanbonmatsu, senior scholar at the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University and the report's co-author, said women running in statewide executive races, excluding governor and lieutenant governor, face greater campaign finance challenges than men.

She explained from both a donor and recipient perspective, there are significant discrepancies between men and women.

"We hear so much about how well women are doing as voters; women have outvoted men for many years," Sanbonmatsu observed. "I don't know that people realize that women are not at the same rate as 'givers,' as men."

Sanbonmatsu noted part of the lack of campaign contributions may be some statewide elections are below the radar for women, with only 31% of women holding statewide executive office nationwide.

She added it is likely because women often don't earn as much as men, they can't afford to contribute more.

New Mexico's Deb Haaland, now the U.S. Interior Secretary, was one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress in 2018.

Sanbonmatsu argued it's important to recognize "firsts" for women, and also acknowledge how much harder the road might have been for them.

"Certainly with Haaland in power, certainly with Vice President Kamala Harris, this is a new landscape for women and politics, but we're not at parity," Sanbonmatsu acknowledged.

Sanbonmatsu added women remain underrepresented as officeholders for such positions as attorneys general, state treasurers, and secretaries of state, and it's especially true of Asian American, Black, Latina and Native American women.

"Women of color, compared to white women, wield fewer personal resources, and they are less likely as candidates to enter these statewide races," Sanbonmatsu outlined. "So we really need to marshal support for them if we're going to see those numbers go up."

She added women are less likely to self-fund their campaigns and more likely to fundraise in small-dollar amounts, meaning they may face additional burdens in the fundraising process.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
An Associated Press/NORC poll found 47% of people are unlikely to purchase an electric vehicle, with the biggest reason being the high cost. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

As New York and New Jersey transition to electric vehicles, consumers have mixed feelings about it. Polls show fewer than half of New York drivers …


Environment

play sound

Kentucky will receive $74 million to clean up legacy pollution in regions decimated by decades of coal mining. The money is part of $725 million in …

Social Issues

play sound

Legislation in Connecticut could help reduce the ongoing child care workforce shortage Reports show some 40,000 child care positions unfilled…


Researchers said many people in the U.S. have some protection against the COVID virus through vaccination or prior infection. (insta_photos/Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

The Food and Drug Administration has advised makers of the COVID-19 vaccine to formulate the next dosage to fight the JN.1 strain of the virus…

Social Issues

play sound

Full-time LGBTQ+ workers make about 90 cents for every dollar earned by the average worker in the U.S. Today is LGBTQ+ Equal Pay Awareness Day…

South Dakota loses up to 100,000 acres of grasslands annually, according to the South Dakota Grassland Coalition. Grassland bird species are declining faster than any other group on the continent. (Gregory Johnston/Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

About 1.6 million acres of Great Plains grasslands were destroyed in 2021 alone, according to a recent report, an area the size of Delaware. One …

Social Issues

play sound

Help is available for people looking to break out of a low-wage, "go-nowhere" job because the nonprofit Merit America is expanding its training …

play sound

The University of Wyoming is scrambling to address a major funding cut state legislators passed in a footnote to the state budget. During this …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021