skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

ND makes the grade in a national report evaluating public school support; SCOTUS justices express free speech concerns about GOP-backed social media laws; NH "kids on campus" program boosts retention; proposed law bans hemp sales to Hoosiers younger than 21.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Supreme Court hears arguments on whether social media can restrict content. Biden advisors point to anti-democracy speeches at CPAC, and the President heads to the US-Mexico border appealing to voters on immigration and border issues.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

MI Report: Invest Rescue Plan Funds in Affordable, Accessible Housing

play audio
Play

Wednesday, March 23, 2022   

A new report found older Michiganders and people with disabilities face some of the greatest barriers to housing, and systemic racism has led to higher rates of disability among people of color.

Renter households at or below 30% of the median income in Michigan are 77% more likely to include older adults or adults with disabilities.

Julie Cassidy, senior policy analyst at the Michigan League for Public Policy and the report's author, said the pandemic worsened a shortage of affordable housing which had already reached a crisis point in many communities, and people with disabilities and older Americans often are disproportionately impacted.

"Skyrocketing home prices and rents over the last decade or so really affect them the most," Cassidy pointed out. "And people with disabilities have faced compounding discrimination throughout their lives, and that limits their earnings as adults."

The report showed nearly one in three Michiganders has a disability, and Michigan is one of the fastest-aging states in the nation. Cassidy argued it is important to use funds from the American Rescue Plan Act to both promote aging in place and to improve quality of life for those in congregate nursing-home settings.

Cassidy added disability rates increase with age, and systemic racism has created disparities as well. She noted Black, brown and Indigenous people face higher exposure to pollution, substandard housing conditions and experience of toxic stress at higher rates.

"Many of these things are a result of residential segregation and other discriminatory housing policies that have been occurring in our country for decades, and those disparities widen as people grow older," Cassidy explained. "In this way, kind of ableism and ageism tend to have a disproportionate impact on people of color."

The report suggested using American Rescue Plan funds to invest in home repairs and modifications for safety and accessibility, expand access to home- and community-based care and invest in the care workforce. It also recommended reducing nursing-home crowding by developing smaller homes, for 10 or 12 people, and converting multi-person rooms to singles to reduce the spread of contagious illness.

Cassidy emphasized the importance of accessible housing being well integrated into the community. She contended when developers seek subsidies from the state, accessibility standards vary based on size of the building, so there are often not enough units, and they are often segregated in certain buildings or neighborhoods. She hopes to see new standards applied to all buildings.

"This will give people more options throughout the community," Cassidy outlined. "And give them options in neighborhoods where they have better access to jobs, education, health care, transportation, recreation, all of those things that we all need to live a full and healthy life."

Disclosure: Michigan League for Public Policy/KIDS COUNT contributes to our fund for reporting on Budget Policy and Priorities, Children's Issues, Livable Wages/Working Families, and Poverty Issues. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A new report shows that people who complete Prop 47-funded programs like those offered at Safe Harbor Recovery Center in Los Angeles are much less likely to be reincarcerated. (Safe Harbor)

Social Issues

play sound

Programs intended to reduce the chances that someone will end up back behind bars are working, according to a new analysis of California state data…


Social Issues

play sound

Arizona is gearing up for its presidential preference election that takes place in less than a month, and registered Democrats and Republicans were …

play sound

You might say "every day is 'bring your child to college day'" at New Hampshire's Manchester Community College. On-campus childcare programs are …


Social Issues

play sound

The number of Black mothers in Ohio who die during or following pregnancy continues to climb and health advocates said they hope to shine a light on t…

Legislative supporters say had South Dakota taken part in a new federally funded summer meal program for low-income families, an estimated 54,000 children around the state would have benefited. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

It's been an uphill battle for childhood nutrition advocates to advance meal access policies in the South Dakota Legislature. However, organizers say …

Environment

play sound

A cooperative effort has seeded more than 26,000 acres in eastern Nevada. It's all in an effort to increase desirable grasses, forbs and shrubs while …

Social Issues

play sound

Texas postal customers, especially in rural areas, are experiencing delays in mail delivery, and some letter carriers feel it could get worse…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021