Sunday, February 5, 2023

Play

Ohio governor calls for investments in education, child well-being; UT tribes urge lawmakers to pass a bill ensuring protections for Native kids; body positivity movement helps improve body image and alleviate shame.

Play

The Democratic National Committee votes to shake up the presidential primary calendar, President Biden gets a better than expected jobs report before his second State of the Union, and lawmakers from both parties question the response to a Chinese data gathering balloon.

Play

Is bird flu, inflation or price gouging to blame for astronomical egg prices? Pregnancy can be life-changing or life-ending depending on where you live, and nine tribal schools are transforming their outdoor spaces into community gathering areas.

L.A. County Creates New Department of Youth Development

Play

Tuesday, July 12, 2022   

Los Angeles County, the nation's most populous county, is revamping its approach to juvenile justice, launching a new Department of Youth Development, which will take a more supportive, less punitive approach.

The agency made its debut July 1, and aims to divert teens away from the justice system and toward social services.

Vincent Holmes, interim director of the Department, said more kids with low-level offenses will bypass the courts, incarceration and probation.

"Instead, you're going to be referred to a community-based organization that understands the dynamics and the culture of your community," Holmes explained. "That agency is going to engage with you and your family unit, to do an assessment and determine exactly what types of services you may need, what type of care plan needs to be created for you."

Youths may be offered counseling, or make amends via a restorative justice program. The county's previous diversion programs operated via a patchwork of agreements with local police agencies, serving just 700 youths last year, according to Holmes. But he pointed out about 85% of youth who are arrested in Los Angeles are accused of crimes making them eligible for diversion programs; about 6,500 a year as of 2018.

Holmes noted the first order of business is to expand the diversion program countywide. Part of the goal is to reduce the number of youths of color caught up in the juvenile justice system.

"We believe that's certainly one way that we'll be able to address the disparate, disproportionate representation that we see Black and brown young people in our justice system," Holmes contended.

A 2021 study from the Sentencing Project found Latino youth were 28% more likely than their white peers to be detained or committed to juvenile facilities, which is a big improvement over 2021, when Latino youths were incarcerated 80% more often than white youths.


get more stories like this via email
A researcher examines Kernza grains. (The Land Institute)

Environment

By Jake Christie for Great Lakes Echo. Broadcast version by Mike Moen for Minnesota News Connection, reporting for Great Lakes Echo/Solutions …


Social Issues

By Gabes Torres for Yes! Media. Broadcast version by Kathryn Carley for Maine News Service, reporting for the YES! Media-Public News Service …

Social Issues

Tribal leaders from the eight federally recognized tribes in Utah gathered at a news conference at the state Capitol this week and called on state law…


In 2022, Ohio had 1,580,547 students enrolled in a total of 3,136 public schools across the state, according to the Ohio Department of Education. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

Ohio's teachers are applauding the governor's recently announced plan to overhaul the state's reading curriculum for elementary schoolers and boost re…

Environment

As the economy has changed with the pandemic in the past few years, Indiana's small communities have seen an exodus of jobs and people. However…

The Biochar Research Network Act would have set up as many as 20 biochar research facilities across the country. (K.salo.85/Wikimedia Commons)

Environment

By Lisa Held for Civil Eats. Broadcast version by Eric Tegethoff for Big Sky Connection, reporting for Civil Eats/Solutions Journalism/Public News …

Social Issues

Students who are also parents face more challenges getting through college, but support for these students is getting an upgrade at Bowie State …

Social Issues

Arizona State University, YouTube and the video channel Crash Course have announced a partnership to offer a series of online courses for college …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021