skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Electric bus movement looks to accelerate; Macron says he has not ruled out using Western troop to help Ukraine stand-up to Russia; two rural Iowa newspapers saved from extinction; BLM announces added protections for sensitive Oregon landscape.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Speaker Johnson commits to avoiding a government shutdown. Republican Senators call for a trial of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. And a Democratic Senator aims to ensure protection for IVF nationwide.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

MO Project to Disrupt 'School-to-Prison Pipeline' Gets a Boost

play audio
Play

Thursday, December 15, 2022   

A new federal grant is giving schools in three Missouri counties and St. Louis City a fresh look at the challenges of students of color living with disabilities.

Missouri students of color with disabilities face harsher school disciplinary practices than their white peers, which can lead them into the juvenile justice system. Disrupting this path is the goal of the Missouri Juvenile Justice Association's SToPP Project, with a $275,000 grant from the Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council.

Miranda Fredrick, communications coordinator for the council, said its research, as well as the "lived experience" of some of its members, has demonstrated the disparity.

"When students experience harsh, disproportionate discipline happening in the school systems, it puts them on a path to interact with the criminal justice system," Fredrick explained. "That's what's known as that 'school-to-prison-pipeline,' and those suspensions can have long-term effects."

The grant will cover training in more constructive approaches to discipline, for teams of adults in Boone, Cape Girardeau and Greene counties, and St. Louis City.

An ACLU of Missouri study found Black students with disabilities are three times more likely to be suspended than their white peers.

Liz Ballard, racial ethnic disparities coordinator for the Missouri Juvenile Justice Association, said with the help of a "restorative justice" expert, they'll train teams in less punitive ways to discipline students. Ideally, each team will include a school representative, a law enforcement or school resource officer, a local juvenile office representative, and a community or family member, or a person with a developmental disability.

She added they will receive certification as trainers, so they can share what they learn.

"There's these things called healing circles, where they all sit down and work through the issue," Ballard pointed out. "There's just proven to be better outcomes and more, you know, case-by-case basis instead of cut-and-dry suspensions."

Students who are suspended or expelled, who may also be victims of poverty, abuse or neglect, are three times more likely to have an encounter with the juvenile justice system within a year. Ballard said their hope is the teams' success will change the trajectory and foster interest throughout the state.

"We will have four counties that have decreased their suspension and expulsion rate, treating kids fairly regardless of their developmental disabilities," Ballard noted. "And then, word gets out, and then it spreads, and people start reaching out to want additional training."


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A new report shows that people who complete Prop 47-funded programs like those offered at Safe Harbor Recovery Center in Los Angeles are much less likely to be reincarcerated. (Safe Harbor)

Social Issues

play sound

Programs intended to reduce the chances that someone will end up back behind bars are working, according to a new analysis of California state data…


Social Issues

play sound

Arizona is gearing up for its presidential preference election that takes place in less than a month, and registered Democrats and Republicans were …

play sound

You might say "every day is 'bring your child to college day'" at New Hampshire's Manchester Community College. On-campus childcare programs are …


Social Issues

play sound

The number of Black mothers in Ohio who die during or following pregnancy continues to climb and health advocates said they hope to shine a light on t…

Legislative supporters say had South Dakota taken part in a new federally funded summer meal program for low-income families, an estimated 54,000 children around the state would have benefited. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

It's been an uphill battle for childhood nutrition advocates to advance meal access policies in the South Dakota Legislature. However, organizers say …

Environment

play sound

A cooperative effort has seeded more than 26,000 acres in eastern Nevada. It's all in an effort to increase desirable grasses, forbs and shrubs while …

Social Issues

play sound

Texas postal customers, especially in rural areas, are experiencing delays in mail delivery, and some letter carriers feel it could get worse…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021