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Wednesday, May 22, 2024

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Black voters in battleground states are a crucial voting bloc in 2024; Nikki Haley says she's voting for Trump in November; healthcare advocates suggest medical collaboration to treat fibroids; distinct vibes at IU Indianapolis pro-Palestinian protest.

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The House GOP moves to strike mention of Trump's criminal trial from the record, and his former rival Nikki Haley endorses him. Meanwhile, Ohio Republicans reject a legislative fix to ensure Biden's name appears on the November ballot.

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Smokey Bear thought only "you" could prevent forest fires, but mushrooms may also help, a Native American community in Oregon is achieving healthcare sovereignty, and Colorado farmers hope fast-maturing, drought-tolerant seeds will better handle climate change.

Solarize campaign vets KY solar companies for consumers

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Wednesday, April 10, 2024   

As out-of-state, and sometimes disreputable companies offering solar installations crowd the market, a local effort called Solarize aims to connect residents and small businesses with pre-screened solar contractors, while also providing discounts on installation.

Nick Hartnett, Pure Power Solar and Solarize partner, said residents considering solar should find local companies, read reviews, and talk to customers who've had systems installed, adding the Solarize program is designed to do the legwork.

"There's a lot of aggressive sales techniques. And so, when companies that aren't really invested in the local community, and don't plan on being there, for a while, come in with a goal to just sell as much as they can," he said.

David Gomez of Daily Green Power, another Solarize installation partner, says his company went through a thorough analysis based on experience and work quality to be selected as a vetted contractor.

Andy McDonald, Solarize Frankfort Coordinator, said enrolling in Solarize allows residents to get a free solar assessment and installation estimate from contractors screened to work for the program.

"There's no obligation of people to buy anything. If after they get an assessment from Solarize Frankfort, they want to go get estimates from other contractors, they're welcome to do that. But they'll be empowered with information from us about the solar potential on their property," he continued.

Frankfort homeowner David Hensley said after doing online research on solar installation, he decided to use Solarize.

"The price was actually lower than it would have been if I'd gone out by myself. Plus the fact that these people had a good reputation, they've been vetted by both local and state agencies. That made me feel quite confident in the decision just to simply go with them, " he explained.

A few months later, Hensley is saving money on his electricity bills and is playing his part in reducing carbon emissions, he said.

Disclosure: Kentucky Solar Energy Society and Kentucky Resources Council contributes to our fund for reporting on Energy Policy, Environment, Water. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


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