skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Saturday, June 22, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

America's 'Radical Elders' continue their work for fairness, justice; SCOTUS upholds law disarming domestic abusers; Workplace adoption benefits help families, communities; Report examines barriers to successful post-prison re-entry in NC.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

A congresswoman celebrates Biden protections for mixed status families, Louisiana's Ten Commandments law faces an inevitable legal challenge, and a senator moves to repeal the strict 19th century anti-obscenity and anti-abortion Comstock Act.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural educators say they need support to teach kids social issues, rural businesses can suffer when dollar stores come to town, prairie states like South Dakota are getting help to protect grasslands and a Minnesota town claims the oldest rural Pride Festival.

Smart Meters - They’re Smart, But Are They Safe?

play audio
Play

Monday, November 8, 2010   

SAN FRANCISCO - PG&E's Smart Meters may be smart, but some Californians say they're making them sick. Nearly two dozen communities have placed moratoriums on the wireless utility meters, and more than 2,000 health-related complaints have been received by the California Public Utilities Commission.

Elizabeth Kelley, founder of the Electromagnetic Safety Alliance, says the wireless meters are invasive and involuntary, so people should be able to opt-out of the program.

"Because we don't know yet what the health risks are from these low-powered frequencies that are eventually going to be traveling through our home night and day emitting pulse radio frequency radiation, this is causing considerable concern."

Kelley says especially for people who suffer from electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). PG&E contends its meters comply with federal safety standards and are well within what you would find with normal household appliances.

Kelley says more research should have been done before the devices were put in people's homes.

"There are no specific studies on Smart Meters, but there are comparable studies on very low power non-ionizing radiation exposure conditions, namely cellular antennas, which show there can be harm under certain exposure conditions."

Olle Johansson is a professor in the department of neuroscience at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. He's collaborating with leading international scientists on a proposal recommending global governments adopt new, more stringent, exposure guidelines for wireless technologies.

"We have looked upon the current literature in the science field and it's obvious that the current guidelines for public exposure are definitely obsolete and need to be replaced by biologically based guidelines, taking into account various forms of health effects."

In July, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to require warning labels on cell phones and education on risks at the point of sale.

A program on wireless hazards Wednesday at the San Francisco Library will feature leading activists addressing concerns about Smart Meters, cell phones and cell towers, followed by a screening of the documentary, "Full Signal." A Nov. 18 program at the Commonwealth Club will include leading international scientists addressing health issues related to a variety of wireless technologies.

More information is available at http://electromagnetichealth.org.




get more stories like this via email

more stories
The 2024 Summer U.S. Conference of Mayors in Kansas City, Mo., will be under the leadership of its president, Mayor Hillary Schieve of Reno, Nev., and host Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas.
(SeanPavonePhoto/Adobe Stock)

play sound

Some Michigan mayors are out of the office this week - but still working for their cities. They're at the 92nd meeting of the United States …


Social Issues

play sound

Summer is here, but some Wisconsin households juggling higher consumer costs and other basic needs might feel like a vacation is out of reach…

Social Issues

play sound

An interim North Dakota legislative committee this week got an update from state leaders on potential moves to reconnect kids in foster care with thei…


Social Issues

play sound

More employers are offering benefits to adoptive parents, according to a new survey by the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. The amount of paid …

About a quarter of Americans hold unfavorable views of both former President Donald Trump and President Joe Biden. (Christian Delbert/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

The Arizona Court of Appeals recently dismissed a case brought by Republican Arizona attorney general candidate Abraham Hamadeh, Republican Cochise …

Social Issues

play sound

North Carolina's business community is alarmed after Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson praised the controversial House Bill 2, known as the "Bathroom Bill," at …

Social Issues

play sound

Members of the group Radical Elders are participating in a Chicago tech conference this weekend to explain the impact of technology on older Americans…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021