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SCOTUS begins issuing new opinions, with another expected related to the power of federal agencies, the battleground state of Wisconsin gets a ruling on alternative voting sites, and coastal work is being done to help salt marshes withstand hurricanes.

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The Supreme Court for now protects access to abortion drug mifepristone, while Senate Republicans block a bill protecting access to in-vitro fertilization. Wisconsin's Supreme Court bans mobile voting sites, and colleges deal with funding cuts as legislatures target diversity programs.

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As summer nears, America's newest and largest international dark sky sanctuary beckons, rural job growth is up, but full recovery remains elusive, rural Americans living in prison towns support a transition, while birth control is more readily available in rural areas.

Paraeducators Protest Work Cutbacks – and Win

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Monday, August 15, 2011   

TACOMA, Wash. - As many schools ponder cutting another ten percent from their budgets in the coming months at the governor's request, the Tacoma School District's decision not to cut some employees' hours is a stark contrast. Those employees are paraeducators, who work one-on-one with students with severe physical or learning disabilities. Already some of the lowest-paid workers at schools, their hours were going to be trimmed by 30 minutes a day.

Paraeducator Barbara Randall-Saleh, who is president of the Tacoma Federation of Paraeducators, says the cuts would have made them part-timers, affecting not only their paychecks, but also their health insurance.

"It just meant for several people that they would have to be looking for another job, because they just couldn't make ends meet with half an hour being cut, plus the increase in cost to their medical benefits. So, it's a great boost for everybody."

Randall-Saleh says there's already not enough time in the school day for many special-needs students, and her colleagues often stay at school longer - without pay - although they've been told that is technically against the law.

"It's the paraeducator that's with 'em in the morning when they get them off the bus. They're with 'em in the afternoon when they put 'em back on the bus to send them home. One concern is their safety. We do it because we care about the students."

She credits the paraeducators, and also the teachers who voiced support for them, for convincing the district not to cut their hours. They wrote letters, testified and even picketed at school board meetings over the summer, suggesting that the district could look for savings in non-instructional areas instead.

There are about 600 paraeducators in the Tacoma school district.


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