Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 23, 2019 


A top US diplomat testifies that millions in military aid was held up over Trump demand for "Biden probe." Also on our rundown, a hearing today targets Big Oil and "climate denial."

2020Talks - October 23, 2019 


Facebook says it blocked four networks of social media accounts to prevent election interference; and Julin Castro announces he might not have enough cash on hand to keep the campaign going.

Daily Newscasts

Proposal Would Open Doors to Faster Internet for All Illinoisans

PHOTO: Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler is recommending the strongest open-Internet regulations ever proposed by the agency, which would classify the web the same as any other utility. Photo credit: Blalse Alleyene/Flickr.
PHOTO: Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler is recommending the strongest open-Internet regulations ever proposed by the agency, which would classify the web the same as any other utility. Photo credit: Blalse Alleyene/Flickr.
February 5, 2015

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - The head of the Federal Communications Commission is proposing to reclassify the Internet the same as a utility, which would improve access for rural Illinoisans.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced yesterday he will seek to have the Internet regulated under Title II of the Communications Act.

Whitney Kimball Coe, program associate for the Center for Rural Strategies says it would create a free and open Internet for everyone.

"The ability to communicate and to have access to places where you can contribute knowledge and also gain knowledge, that just seems to be a basic human right at this point," she says. "Rural folks are pretty used to being in the slow lane, and I think we're tired of it and we're looking for greater access."

The proposal allows the creation of regulations to ban paid prioritization of content and services across all Internet platforms including mobile broadband. It's estimated that more than half of rural Americans have no access to high-speed Internet.

Much of the debate over net neutrality has centered around Internet providers who want to charge fees for fast-speed lanes on their networks. But Kimball Coe says it's more than that for rural Illinoisans.

"While net neutrality has become a big issue, we're still talking about the need for access and not just talking about wanting a faster Internet," she says. "We want to actually get on the Internet."

Opponents argue the proposal is overreaching and would stifle investment and customer choice. The commission must approve the proposal, and a vote is expected Feb. 26.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - IL