skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Thursday, April 18, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

A new study shows health disparities cost Texas billions of dollars; Senate rejects impeachment articles against Mayorkas, ending trial against Cabinet secretary; Iowa cuts historical rural school groups.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Senate dismisses the Mayorkas impeachment. Maryland Lawmakers fail to increase voting access. Texas Democrats call for better Black maternal health. And polling confirms strong support for access to reproductive care, including abortion.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural Wyoming needs more vocational teachers to sustain its workforce pipeline, Ohio environmental advocates fear harm from a proposal to open 40-thousand forest acres to fracking and rural communities build bike trail systems to promote nature, boost the economy.

Clean-Power Advocates Expect More from Target's Solar Plans

play audio
Play

Tuesday, February 16, 2016   

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - An environmental group says it's expecting more from Target's plan to set up rooftop solar panels. Target, based in Minneapolis, pledged last year to install panels on 500 of its stores by 2020.

But according to a report released today called "Solar on Superstores," the retail giant could do more by expanding the plan to all 2,000 locations.

Megan Spear, solar coordinator with Environment Minnesota, says the company's initial plan is a step in the right direction, but she points out Target owns enough roof space to power 230,000 homes with solar energy.

"They're second only to Walmart, with 240 million square feet of roof space," says Spear. "Because they've already shown they want to do more with their previous commitment, we want to give them that extra push to go all the way."

Spear and other clean-energy advocates are kicking off a campaign today to get the state's other big-box stores to also consider using their rooftop spaces for solar-power production.

Some retailers have been hesitant to adopt the technology. They cite the challenges of other equipment already mounted on commercial rooftops, and the high initial purchase price of solar energy systems.

But after today's report, Spear argues the long-term benefits could outweigh the costs of installing rooftop solar.

"We could potentially cut 919,000 metric tons of carbon pollution, in Minnesota alone," she says. "And Minnesota business locations could potentially save $91 million annually on their electricity bills."

Some groups, including the National Parks Conservation Association, have said large-scale solar farms can hurt some ecosystems. Environment Minnesota says that's another reason to use overhead commercial space for the installations instead.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
Environmental advocates are asking California's next state budget to prioritize climate mitigation and cut tax breaks for fossil fuel companies. (The Climate Center)

Environment

play sound

As state budget negotiations continue, groups fighting climate change are asking California lawmakers to cut subsidies for oil and gas companies …


Health and Wellness

play sound

Health disparities in Texas are not only making some people sick, but affecting the state's economy. A new study shows Texas is losing $7 billion a …

Environment

play sound

City and county governments are feeling the pinch of rising operating costs but in Wisconsin, federal incentives are driving a range of local …


Each year since 2018, there have been more than 1 million online ads for guns which could be sold without a background check. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Well over three-fourths of Americans support universal background checks for gun purchases, but federal law allows unlicensed people to sell guns at …

Social Issues

play sound

Last year's Medicaid expansion in South Dakota increased eligibility to another 51,000 adults but a new report showed among people across the state wh…

Senate Bill 2019, sponsored by Rep. Shane Reeves, R-Bedford, is expected to be signed by the governor. It would take effect July 1, 2024. (18percentgrey/Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

There is light at the end of the tunnel for Tennesseans struggling with opioid addiction, as a bill has been passed to increase access to treatment …

Environment

play sound

The New York HEAT Act might not make the final budget. The bill reduces the state's reliance on natural gas and cuts ratepayer costs by eliminating …

Social Issues

play sound

Washington joins a handful of states to do away with mandatory meetings for employees on political or religious matters. Sometimes known as captive …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021