skip to main content

Thursday, June 1, 2023

play newscast audioPlay

Alabamans urge a grocery tax reduction, a tape shows Trump knew about a classified document on Iran, Pennsylvania puts federal road funds to work and Minnesota's marijuana law will wipe away minor offenses.

play newscast audioPlay

Democrats say a wealth tax would help alleviate some national debt, lawmakers aim to continue pandemic-era funding for America's child care sector, and teachers say firearms at school will make students less safe.

play newscast audioPlay

Oregon may expand food stamp eligibility to some undocumented households, rural areas have a new method of accessing money for roads and bridges, and Tennessee's new online tool helps keep track of cemetery locations.

Will Indiana Put Paid Family Leave on the Front Burner?

play audio
Play

Wednesday, December 14, 2016   

INDIANAPOLIS – One in three Hoosiers struggles to afford the basic necessities, and those also are the workers least likely to have access to paid family and medical leave.

A new report by the Indiana Institute for Working Families looks at what other states and countries are doing for working families. The report said in states where there are strong family-leave policies, employers report less job turnover, especially with female employees.

The Institute's policy analyst, Erin Macey, said Indiana welcomes about 85,000 new babies into the world every year, yet many parents don't have paid time off, so they either lose pay or go back to work early.

"We're seeing estimates that as many as one in four women are going back to work two weeks after giving birth," she said. "And we know that a car accident or a cancer diagnosis can just sink a family financially, in the absence of access to these kinds of support."

The report's recommendations include setting up job protections for those who take leave, replacing lost wages, and creating more flexible time-off policies. The Indiana Commission for Women got a federal grant to come up with proposals for paid family leave in the state. That will likely result in some legislation, but Macey said it probably won't be until 2018.

Macey added lack of paid leave also affects people who have sick or elderly parents. She said some are losing, or leaving, their jobs so they can take care of them.

"And that's a problem that's only going to get worse as our communities continue to age and we sort of cap out of the resources we have to support them," she added.

The Council for Disability Awareness suggests one in four of today's 20-year-olds will experience a disabling event, such as a back injury, cancer, or heart disease, before they retire. It also said those who drop out of the workforce due to illness or to care for family lose an average of $300,000 in wages and benefits over their lifetime.


get more stories like this via email

A new park, San Vicente Redwoods, opened up late last year near Santa Cruz, Calif., in an area previously ravaged by fire and logging. (Nadia Hamey)

Environment

play sound

This Saturday, June 3, thousands of Californians will be among hundreds of thousands of Americans heading into the great outdoors to celebrate …


Social Issues

play sound

Two months from today, Minnesota will begin the process of removing low-level marijuana convictions for those who have them on their criminal records…

Social Issues

play sound

Navigating college can seem overwhelming for first generation students, but an early outreach program at Arizona State University aims to change it…


Nebraska was one of 10 states to further restrict abortion access in the 2023 legislative session. At least 48 bills were passed involving restrictions for LGBTQ+ individuals. (Yurii Kibalnik/Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

A new Nebraska law is now the subject of a lawsuit filed in the District Court of Lancaster County. In its amended form, Legislative Bill 574 …

Social Issues

play sound

A proposal from the federal government could provide a better path toward student loan debt repayment, but a new survey finds many borrowers don't …

The Biden administration has set a goal of deploying 30 gigawatts of offshore wind electricity generation by 2030, enough to power more than 10 million American homes. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

Maine lawmakers are considering two pieces of legislation which supporters said are needed to ensure "responsible" development of offshore wind projec…

Social Issues

play sound

As the COVID-19 pandemic has subsided, senior centers in Virginia are welcoming back their participants, and one in particular has shifted some of …

Social Issues

play sound

People cannot be denied a place to live based on their race or disability in Michigan, but some are being turned down based on where they get the …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021