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ND makes the grade in a national report evaluating public school support; SCOTUS justices express free speech concerns about GOP-backed social media laws; NH "kids on campus" program boosts retention; proposed law bans hemp sales to Hoosiers younger than 21.

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The Supreme Court hears arguments on whether social media can restrict content. Biden advisors point to anti-democracy speeches at CPAC, and the President heads to the US-Mexico border appealing to voters on immigration and border issues.

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David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

Help Accessing Health Coverage in Ore. Available to Native Americans

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Thursday, August 3, 2017   

PORTLAND, Ore. – A new care coordination model is helping Oregon's tribal members access the health care they have been promised.

This week, CareOregon started its program for Native Americans in the Oregon Health Plan fee-for-service program, and developed it with nine federally-recognized tribes in the state, as well as the Native American Rehabilitation Association.

Sharon Stanphill, health operations officer for the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, said tribal members usually pick and choose care venues from a number of options. But options can be limited, especially for rural tribal members looking for specialized care.

"CareOregon is really breaking down some of those barriers to health care delivery,” Stanphill said. “And these are barriers that shouldn't be happening for tribal members in Oregon."

She said this new model will help coordinate transportation and social service needs, and will provide culturally appropriate services for Oregon's Native American population.

Jackie Mercer, CEO of the Native American Rehabilitation Association, said this program is going to change lives and help tribal members get the best care they can. Mercer said there are many health disparities in native communities, including higher rates of diabetes, alcoholism, and a suicide rate for young adults that is nearly double the national average.

But Mercer noted these health gaps shouldn't lead to the stereotyping of Native Americans.

"We're not the diseases, we're not those disparities. We're just people trying to make our best way in this world,” Mercer said. "So, investing in native people has tremendous positive outcomes."

Erin Fair Taylor, CareOregon's executive director of legal affairs, said people can participate in this program without any changes to the providers they currently see.

"This program won't require that they change providers. It simply is a resource for people who may not know where to go, who may not know what next steps might be for accessing the care that they need,” Taylor explained. "They can call us and we can help navigate the system on their behalf."


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