skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, February 20, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Minnesota public safety agencies reeling from weekend tragedy; Speaker Johnson faces critical decision on Ukraine aid; Public comment sought on proposal to limit growth in health-care costs; MS postal union workers voice concerns about understaffing, mail delays.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Truckers for Trump threaten to strike over his massive civil fine for business fraud in New York City. Biden wants Norfolk Southern held accountable one year after an Ohio derailment and dangerous chemical spill and faith leaders call for peace in the Israel-Hamas war.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Drones over West Texas aim to improve rural healthcare, the Ogallala Aquifer, the backbone of High Plains agriculture, is slowly disappearing and federal money is headed to growers of wool and cotton.

CT Treatment Pilot Trains Providers on Addiction Stigma, Pain Management

play audio
Play

Friday, November 19, 2021   

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Drug overdose deaths across the country are on the rise, and a new pilot program kicks off this month in Connecticut to help clinicians better treat injured workers and opioid addiction.

A collaboration between the Yale Program in Addiction Medicine and insurance company The Hartford includes training for health-care providers to help them both identify and treat acute and chronic pain, and opioid use disorder. It also focuses on preventing stigma among medical professionals.

David Fiellin, director of the program in addiction medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, said because chronic pain and addiction are both highly stigmatized, they can result in people not seeking treatment.

"For instance, medications for opioid use disorder are highly stigmatized," Fiellin observed. "However, they also decrease death rates by 50%. And so, we want to make sure that people understand these medical conditions, the role of these medications, how effective they are."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data reveal the number of overdose deaths during a 12-month period ending this past April topped more than 100,000 for the first time.

The Hartford is seeing a rise in the prevalence of opioid use disorder among injured workers. Opioid prescriptions can start with a chronic pain diagnosis.

Adam Seidner, chief medical officer at The Hartford, said treating chronic pain takes a multidisciplinary approach, including behavioral and medication-based treatment.

"When it's properly managed, many people can resume their lives," Seidner pointed out. "And it really is going to depend on finding good and appropriate pain care, because you can prevent chronic pain."

Seidner added it is important for medical professionals to understand why people misuse substances like opioids. He noted there is a misconception people do it just to get high.

"They're not looking to get altered mental status from all of this," Seidner asserted. "They're just trying to be and feel normal, so they can function. And I think that's probably the biggest thing, is to understand the emotions, the impact of pain, and really then having all the tools available to manage them."


get more stories like this via email
more stories
Around 79% of Arizona voters think the low level of water in rivers is a serious problem, according to the 2024 Conservation in the West Poll. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

Voters from Arizona and across the West say a public official's position on conservation will be an important factor when deciding who to support in t…


Environment

play sound

A new online tool is helping community groups in Boston ensure all neighborhoods reap the benefits from urban tree canopies. The Tree Equity Score …

Environment

play sound

Farming trend researchers are poring over new federal data that only come around every five years. The latest information helps some organizations …


Beyond high-risk situations, such as assisting with a domestic violence call, Minnesota fire chiefs say peer support groups are becoming an important tool as first responders navigate stress from the daily calls they take on. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

The risk first responders face is getting renewed focus following the fatal shooting of two police officers and a paramedic in Minnesota. Amid …

play sound

West Virginia House delegates passed a bill this week that would allow raw milk products from farmers to be sold directly to consumers. Maria Moles…

Social Issues

play sound

Kentucky saw a 48% reduction in child victims of maltreatment from 2018 to 2022, according to the latest federal data. However, child abuse and …

Social Issues

play sound

The Colorado Avalanche has teamed up with Xcel Energy to generate funds to help people struggling to pay their energy bills this winter. Every time …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021