skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Electric bus movement looks to accelerate; Macron says he has not ruled out using Western troop to help Ukraine stand-up to Russia; two rural Iowa newspapers saved from extinction; BLM announces added protections for sensitive Oregon landscape.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Speaker Johnson commits to avoiding a government shutdown. Republican Senators call for a trial of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. And a Democratic Senator aims to ensure protection for IVF nationwide.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

New Bill Allocates Funds for NY's Coastal Resilience Measures

play audio
Play

Monday, August 15, 2022   

The Inflation Reduction Act, newly passed by the U.S. Senate, allocates $369 Billion to fight climate change, and appropriates funds specifically for coastal areas - like New York's - facing climate change's immediate impacts.

$2.6 billion dollars are being set aside to help coastal states build up their resilience to ever worsening hurricanes, floods and rising sea levels.

Jessie Ritter - senior director of water resources and coastal policy at the National Wildlife Federation - says this could help prevent "billion dollar disasters," which will intensify during the upcoming hurricane season.

"2022 was predicted by the National Weather Service to see above average hurricane activity," said Ritter. "And we know the impact of a certain storm can last for many, many years as we saw post-Sandy. And as we're actually now still seeing, as communities continue to struggle to recover from recent storms like Ida and Maria."

Many coastal areas have developed management plans to build up their shoreline's natural defenses to impending climate catastrophes. However, high costs have been a detriment to bringing these plans to fruition.

The money stemming from this bill will help develop those plans further, and allow for technical assistance to improve them.

Ritter said she hopes the immediate impacts of this bill result in coastal states evaluating the infrastructure being developed as resilient to future effects of climate change.

This funding will also provide communities with an ability to alert people pre-disaster to evacuation routes and risks associated with certain coastal areas.

Ritter said she feels this bill's funding is a unique opportunity to tackle the direct causes of climate change, while providing methods to address its symptoms.

"Getting this money out the door and into coastal communities as quickly as possible," said Ritter, "can make a big difference for communities facing down potential for future hurricanes or other major storm events."

Other funds allocated for climate change in the bill will reduce carbon emissions by 40% across the U.S. by 2030.

Ritter said she believes there is still more to do to bridge the gap of meeting the Biden Administration's goal of 50%. She added that Congress really needs to continue stepping up.



Disclosure: National Wildlife Federation contributes to our fund for reporting on Climate Change/Air Quality, Endangered Species & Wildlife, Energy Policy, Environment, Public Lands/Wilderness, Salmon Recovery, Water. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
A new report shows that people who complete Prop 47-funded programs like those offered at Safe Harbor Recovery Center in Los Angeles are much less likely to be reincarcerated. (Safe Harbor)

Social Issues

play sound

Programs intended to reduce the chances that someone will end up back behind bars are working, according to a new analysis of California state data…


Social Issues

play sound

Arizona is gearing up for its presidential preference election that takes place in less than a month, and registered Democrats and Republicans were …

play sound

You might say "every day is 'bring your child to college day'" at New Hampshire's Manchester Community College. On-campus childcare programs are …


Social Issues

play sound

The number of Black mothers in Ohio who die during or following pregnancy continues to climb and health advocates said they hope to shine a light on t…

Legislative supporters say had South Dakota taken part in a new federally funded summer meal program for low-income families, an estimated 54,000 children around the state would have benefited. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

It's been an uphill battle for childhood nutrition advocates to advance meal access policies in the South Dakota Legislature. However, organizers say …

Environment

play sound

A cooperative effort has seeded more than 26,000 acres in eastern Nevada. It's all in an effort to increase desirable grasses, forbs and shrubs while …

Social Issues

play sound

Texas postal customers, especially in rural areas, are experiencing delays in mail delivery, and some letter carriers feel it could get worse…

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021