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Electric bus movement looks to accelerate; Macron says he has not ruled out using Western troop to help Ukraine stand-up to Russia; two rural Iowa newspapers saved from extinction; BLM announces added protections for sensitive Oregon landscape.

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Speaker Johnson commits to avoiding a government shutdown. Republican Senators call for a trial of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. And a Democratic Senator aims to ensure protection for IVF nationwide.

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David meets Goliath in Idaho pesticide conflict, to win over Gen Z voters, candidates are encouraged to support renewable energy and rural America needs help from Congress to continue affordable internet programs.

Old Farmer's Almanac Predicts 'A Tale of Two Winters' for 2023

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Monday, September 12, 2022   

Fall arrives in Texas next week, which means winter and its challenges will be right behind. But never fear, the Old Farmer's Almanac says it will be the best of winter for some and the worst for the rest of us.

Associate Editor Tim Goodwin said predictions suggest half of the country will deal with bone-chilling cold and loads of snow, while the other half may feel like winter never really arrives.

He encourages the western half of the U.S. to prepare for wet and mild conditions, while the eastern half hunkers-down for record-breaking cold.

"When you think of Texas, you don't think of cold, necessarily - but what we're predicting this year is colder than normal," said Goodwin. "You're looking at early to mid-January and early to mid-February are going to be really those coldest periods that you will see this upcoming winter."

The almanac - published since 1818 - claims an 80% accuracy rate. It says fall is going to be warmer and drier than normal in most locations.

In addition to its detailed weather forecasts, Goodwin said he believes the Farmer's Almanac - with its iconic yellow cover - remains popular more than 200 years after its first edition because it also tracks the tides, planting seasons and even how to handle hay fever.

"We've continuously published every single year, through wars, through everything that entire time," said Goodwin. "We're the oldest continuous periodical in North America, and I think it's just one of those things that has been passed on from generation to generation. It's an institution, I think."

Goodwin said for hundreds of years, almanacs claimed a large place in rural life, especially for farmers.

"They'd put it in the outhouse and they'd put it in the barn and the workshop," said Goodwin. "And they'd put it on their belt loops and carry it out with them to the field because they trusted it for those kind of things."




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