skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Wednesday, May 29, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Trump case expected to head to the jury today; IN food banks concerned about draft Farm Bill; NH parents, educators urge veto of anti-LGBTQ+ bills; Study shows a precipitous drop in migratory fish populations, in US and worldwide.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Actor Robert DeNiro joins Capitol Police officers to protest against Donald Trump at his New York hush money trial as both sides make closing arguments. And the Democratic Party moves to make sure President Biden will be on the ballot in Ohio.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Smokey Bear thought only "you" could prevent forest fires, but decomposing mushrooms may also help, a Native American community in Oregon is achieving healthcare sovereignty, and Colorado farmers hope fast-maturing, drought-tolerant seeds will better handle climate change.

HCBS Cuts Threaten Services for Aging Population in Missouri

play audio
Play

Monday, November 28, 2022   

November is National Family Caregivers Month, which focuses attention on the unpaid care work of family members.

The care provided by families often is enabled and supported by state-funded wrap-around services.

Over the last few decades, Missouri and other state governments around the nation have funded Home and Community Based Services - or HCBS - as a cheaper alternative to nursing-home care.

The turn towards HCBSs has meant that aging Americans are more often able to stay in their homes.

The kind of support they provide is broad, and includes visiting and live-in nursing care, in addition to other services such as transportation, home repair, and remodeling to ensure accessibility.

Recent state budget cuts to these programs threaten the availability of in-home care. Jay Hardenbrook, advocacy director with AARP Missouri, said funding HCBS sufficiently benefits all involved.

"It winds up saving the state a lot of money," said Hardenbrook. "It makes families stronger, especially if it's an unpaid family caregiver who's doing that, and it keeps that person receiving the services in the place that they want to be."

Hardenbrook said in Missouri alone, unpaid family caregivers are providing more than $8 billion worth of care. He called them an essential part of the system that doesn't get enough attention.

Funding for HCBSs in the state has declined over the last decade, with the nonprofit Missouri Budget Project reporting a 40% cut in community-based programs in 2018.

Last year the General Assembly injected $200 million from the American Rescue Plan into the system as a one-time payment to support care workers' wages.

Hardenbrook said the state needs to fully fund these programs.

"The state decides how much money goes into these programs," said Hardenbrook. "And if we let them stagnate for a long time as we did until last year, then fewer and fewer people will provide those services. Now that we've done this increase, if we can just keep it up, really we'll have a larger workforce and we'll have more people who are able to stay in their homes because they're able to get the services they need."

Hardenbrook said when aging seniors can't get the care services or home repairs they need, the state often ends up paying more for them to live in a nursing home.

He said while some people utilizing HCBS programs are doing so daily, others may only need occasional help.

"One of the things that has been very helpful, especially among our dementia enrollees, is that a family caregiver can get a day off," said Hardenbrook. "One day of respite is what we call it. But really, 'Can I just have a day where I don't have to be a caregiver all day long?' "

The Missouri Budget Project reports that on average HCBS support costs less than one third of institutional care.






get more stories like this via email
more stories
Coal production in the Powder River Basin was 50% lower in the first quarter of 2024 than the first quarter of 2014, by about 49 million tons. (Robert Coy/Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

A new policy could affect the future of coal mining in the Powder River Basin and in turn, Wyoming's tax structure. The Powder River Basin produced …


Social Issues

play sound

Health care advocates are speaking out against proposed cuts to a California program that provides in-home care aides to low-income seniors and people…

Health and Wellness

play sound

Children's advocates are pressing California lawmakers to pass a bill that would increase oversight on health plans when they deny mental health servi…


Social Issues

play sound

The nonprofit Save the Children is working with child care centers along the Mississippi coast, with plans and tools to help them reopen or resume …

Michigan consistently ranks high as a state for contact volume to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, with the 11th-highest rate in the nation in 2023. (Africa Studio)

Health and Wellness

play sound

Four years after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers are still studying its effects on society. A new report focusing on domestic …

Environment

play sound

Arizona is already warming up, and a new report sheds light on how climate change is intensifying that heat. Last year, just under 650 heat-…

Social Issues

play sound

Residents of north Texas continue to clean up after the latest in a string of deadly tornadoes. According to the National Weather Service, an EF-2 …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021