skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Friday, June 14, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

SCOTUS begins issuing new opinions, with another expected related to the power of federal agencies, the battleground state of Wisconsin gets a ruling on alternative voting sites, and coastal work is being done to help salt marshes withstand hurricanes.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Supreme Court for now protects access to abortion drug mifepristone, while Senate Republicans block a bill protecting access to in-vitro fertilization. Wisconsin's Supreme Court bans mobile voting sites, and colleges deal with funding cuts as legislatures target diversity programs.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

As summer nears, America's newest and largest international dark sky sanctuary beckons, rural job growth is up, but full recovery remains elusive, rural Americans living in prison towns support a transition, while birth control is more readily available in rural areas.

Kids' 'COVID Cavities' Lingering Effect of Pandemic

play audio
Play

Thursday, January 5, 2023   

Young kids and teens have gotten out of regular teeth brushing and flossing, and dentists say "COVID cavities" are a lingering effect of the pandemic.

Dr. Martha Ann Keels of Duke Street Pediatric Dentistry said providers are working to get children back on track. She explained the past few years of virtual schooling at home meant more frequent munching on sugary and chewy snacks, which has led to an uptick in molar cavities.

Keels' top tip for parents in the new year is to stay away from chewy foods.

"Gravitate towards the things that melt like chocolate and M&Ms, and then ice cream or sorbets are a great choice," Keels recommended. "Things that melt off your teeth are a much smarter choice than things that are sticky."

One study published last summer found more parents said their kids' dental health was worse compared to 2019. Increased risk of cavities and other teeth problems were more likely in Hispanic or non-White children, low-income households, and households without health coverage.

Proper oral care begins as soon as teeth crop up in babies. Keels advised starting to floss young children's teeth to prevent cavities which are not visible, and keep plague buildup at bay.

"Parents can be fooled looking in their child's mouth and go, 'Oh, my kid's teeth are, like, cavity free,' and then we get those first X-rays at four, and we sadly say your child's got a mouthful of cavities between their teeth," Keels noted.

Keels added providers are also seeing more families neglect brushing routines and missed appointments as they struggle with depression, anxiety and other mental-health issues.

"So, if you're a parent, and you're anxious or depressed, it's hard to also take care of your children and get back on the right track of taking care of yourself, as well as your children's teeth," Keels acknowledged. "I certainly understand that."

Research shows people suffering from depression tend to have poor dental hygiene and are at higher risk of periodontal disease and mouth pain. The American Dental Association noted thumb-sucking and other stress-related habits can negatively affect kids' teeth.

Disclosure: The North Carolina Dental Society contributes to our fund for reporting on Education, and Health Issues. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
An Associated Press/NORC poll found 47% of people are unlikely to purchase an electric vehicle, with the biggest reason being the high cost. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

As New York and New Jersey transition to electric vehicles, consumers have mixed feelings about it. Polls show fewer than half of New York drivers …


Environment

play sound

Kentucky will receive $74 million to clean up legacy pollution in regions decimated by decades of coal mining. The money is part of $725 million in …

Social Issues

play sound

Legislation in Connecticut could help reduce the ongoing child care workforce shortage Reports show some 40,000 child care positions unfilled…


Of more than 7,300 lawmakers nationwide, just 116, or 1.6%, currently or last worked in manual labor, service industry, clerical or labor union jobs. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Half of Americans go to work every day in the service industry, doing clerical work or in construction and other manual labor jobs but fewer than 2% …

Social Issues

play sound

The age of both presidential front-runners has drawn extra attention in this year's race and meanwhile, North Dakota voters this week embraced …

New data show nearly 30% of Generation Z adults identify as LGBTQ+, according to the Human Rights Campaign. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

play sound

Full-time LGBTQ+ workers make about 90 cents for every dollar earned by the average worker in the U.S. Today is LGBTQ+ Equal Pay Awareness Day…

Environment

play sound

About 1.6 million acres of Great Plains grasslands were destroyed in 2021 alone, according to a recent report, an area the size of Delaware. One …

Social Issues

play sound

Help is available for people looking to break out of a low-wage, "go-nowhere" job because the nonprofit Merit America is expanding its training …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021