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Monday, March 4, 2024

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Democracy Trailblazers ignite enthusiasm among teen voters; CA monster blizzard batters Tahoe, Mammoth, Sierra amid avalanche warnings; MN transportation sector could be next in line for carbon-free standard; IN teachers 'stunned' by lawmakers' bid to bypass collective bargaining.

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Nikki Haley says she may not endorse the GOP nominee, President Biden says the U-S will continue air-dropping aid into Gaza and more states look at ditching the electoral college for a national popular vote.

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Hard times could be ahead for rural school districts that spent federal pandemic money on teacher salaries, a former Oregon lumber community drafts a climate-action plan and West Virginians may soon buy raw milk from squeaky-clean cows.

Boston Moves to Implement Climate-Friendly Building Code

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Monday, April 10, 2023   

Boston is set to become the eighth and largest city in the Commonwealth to implement a new state climate-friendly building code to reduce the use of fossil fuels in the building sector.

The "specialized stretch code" as it is known, does not ban the use of fossil fuels for heating or appliances, but it offers strong financial incentives for developers to ensure buildings are wired for electrification.

Logan Malik, executive director of the Massachusetts Climate Action Network, called it a critical step toward creating energy efficient and climate-resilient buildings.

"And it's also going to significantly reduce energy use," Malik pointed out. "Which could bring down costs for consumers."

Malik noted more electrification would also significantly improve indoor air quality. Buildings account for nearly 30% of greenhouse-gas emissions statewide, and nearly 70% of emissions in Boston alone.

Studies show communities of color are 1.5 times more likely to experience poor air quality than white communities.

Malik emphasized while the new building code will ensure improved housing stock in the future, city officials also need to make sure residents of existing buildings have access to the same environmental benefits.

"We really need to make significant investments in the City of Boston in retrofitting buildings that serve low- and moderate-income residents and folks in environmental-justice communities," Malik contended.

Malik is encouraging state officials to invest in the Zero Carbon Renovation Fund to prioritize the most vulnerable communities for energy efficient upgrades. It will take a multipronged approach, he said, to meet the state's goal of reaching net-zero emissions by 2050.


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